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Publications

IWPR publishes its research in formats ranging from short fact sheets to longer form research reports. The Institute publishes on topics addressing the policy needs of women, including pay equity, retirement security, family leave, paid sick days, and employment.

For a full overview of our research areas and to view publications by topic, please visit our Initiatives area. All publications are available for free download on our website or you may choose to buy them through the Google Checkout icon to the right of the publication listing.  To request a publication by phone or e-mail, please contact Mallory Mpare at 202-785-5100 or mpare@iwpr.org.

Browse our publications below or use our Publication Finder to search for what you're looking for.

Latest Reports from IWPR

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Transforming the Political Agenda? Gender Differences in Bill Sponsorship on Women's Issues
by IWPR (October 2000)

Summarizes research by Michele Swers, Mary Washington College, that shows taht women members of the U.S. Congress are more likely to pursue legislation addressing women's issues (child support, women's health, family safety, e.g.) than are men members of Congress. Available by mail in limited quantities. E-mail iwpr [at] iwpr [dot] org to place an order.

 

Fall 2000 Quarterly Newsletter
by (October 2000)

 
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The Outcomes of Welfare Reform for Women
by Barbara Gault, Annisah Umrani (September 2000)

An overview of research conducted shortly after the 1996 welfare refor. Highlights unique labor market and family care issues faced by women, women of color, and immigrants. Argues for greater investment in the human capital of low-income women.

 

Paid Family and Medical Leave: Supporting Working Families in Illinois
by Vicky Lovell, Ph.D. (September 2000)

 

The Status of Women in Delaware: Highlights
by (August 2000)

Delaware reflects both the advances and limited progress achieved by women in the United States. Women in Delaware and the United States as a whole are seeing important changes in their lives and in their access to political, economic, and social rights. However, they by no means enjoy equality with men, and they still lack many of the legal guarantees that would allow them to achieve that equality. Women in Delaware and the nation would benefit from stronger enforcement of equal opportunity laws, better political representation, adequate and affordable child care, and other policies that would help improve their status.

 

Summer 2000 Quarterly Newsletter
by (August 2000)

 

The Status of Women in Tennessee: Highlights
by (July 2000)

Tennessee reflects both the advances and limited progress achieved by women in the United States. Women in Tennessee and the United States as a whole are seeing important changes in their lives and in their access to political, economic, and social rights. However, they by no means enjoy equality with men, and they still lack many of the legal guarantees that would allow them to achieve that equality. Women in Tennessee and the nation would benefit from stronger enforcement of equal opportunity laws, better political representation, adequate and affordable child care, and other policies that would help improve their status.

 

Overview of the Status of Women in the States
by (July 2000)

Women’s progress over the past century has involved both great achievements and significant shortfalls. Many U.S. women are witnessing real improvements in their economic, political, and social status. Not all women, however, enjoy equal access to the country’s political, social, and economic resources, nor are they sharing equally in the fruits of progress or prosperity. Women by no means enjoy equality with men, and they still lack many of the legal guarantees that would allow them to achieve it.

 

The Status of Women in New Hampshire: Highlights
by (July 2000)

New Hampshire reflects both the advances and limited progress achieved by women in the United States. Women in New Hampshire and the United States as a whole are seeing important changes in their lives and in their access to political, economic, and social rights. However, they by no means enjoy equality with men, and they still lack many of the legal guarantees that would allow them to achieve that equality. Women in New Hampshire and the nation would benefit from stronger enforcement of equal opportunity laws, better political representation, adequate and affordable child care, and other policies that would help improve their status.

 

The Status of Women in Minnesota: Highlights
by (July 2000)

Minnesota reflects both the advances and limited progress achieved by women in the United States. Women in Minnesota and the United States as a whole are seeing important changes in their lives and in their access to political, economic, and social rights. However, they by no means enjoy equality with men, and they still lack many of the legal guarantees that would allow them to achieve that equality. Women in Minnesota and the nation would benefit from stronger enforcement of equal opportunity laws, better political representation, adequate and affordable child care, and other policies that would help improve their status.

 

The Status of Women in Indiana:Highlights
by (July 2000)

Indiana reflects both the advances and limited progress achieved by women in the United States. Women in Indiana and the United States as a whole are seeing important changes in their lives and in their access to political, economic, and social rights. However, they by no means enjoy equality with men, and they still lack many of the legal guarantees that would allow them to achieve that equality. Women in Indiana and the nation would benefit from stronger enforcement of equal opportunity laws, better political representation, adequate and affordable child care, and other policies that would help improve their status.

 

The Status of Women in Hawaii: Highlights
by (July 2000)

Hawai‘i reflects both the advances and limited progress achieved by women in the United States. Women in Hawai‘i and the United States as a whole are seeing important changes in their lives and in their access to political, economic, and social rights. However, they by no means enjoy equality with men, and they still lack many of the legal guarantees that would allow them to achieve that equality. Women in Hawai‘i and the nation would benefit from stronger enforcement of equal opportunity laws, better political representation, adequate and affordable child care, and other policies that would help improve their status.

 

The Status of Women in Colorado: Highlights
by (July 2000)

Colorado reflects both the advances and limited progress achieved by women in the United States. Women in Colorado and the United States as a whole are seeing important changes in their lives and in their access to political, economic, and social rights. However, they by no means enjoy equality with men, and they still lack many of the legal guarantees that would allow them to achieve that equality. Women in Colorado and the nation would benefit from stronger enforcement of equal opportunity laws, better political representation, adequate and affordable child care, and other policies that would help improve their status.

 

The Status of Women in Arkansas: Highlights
by (July 2000)

Arkansas reflects both the advances and limited progress achieved by women in the United States. Women in Arkansas and the United States as a whole are seeing important changes in their lives and in their access to political, economic, and social rights. However, they by no means enjoy equality with men, and they still lack many of the legal guarantees that would allow them to achieve that equality. Women in Arkansas and the nation would benefit from stronger enforcement of equal opportunity laws, better political representation, adequate and affordable child care, and other policies that would help improve their status.

 

The Status of Women in Arizona: Highlights
by (July 2000)

Arizona reflects both the advances and limited progress achieved by women in the United States. Women in Arizona and the United States as a whole are seeing important changes in their lives and in their access to political, economic, and social rights. However, they by no means enjoy equality with men, and they still lack many of the legal guarantees that would allow them to achieve that equality. Women in Arizona and the nation would benefit from stronger enforcement of equal opportunity laws, better political representation, adequate and affordable child care, and other policies that would help improve their status.

 
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New and Stronger Remedies Are Needed to Reduce Gender Based Wage Discrimination
by Heidi Hartmann (June 2000)

Testimony before the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. Part of a hearing on Examining Gender-Based Wage Discrimination. Reviews scholarly literature and cites IWPR research to argue that pay equity remedies are needed to reduce the gender wage gap. Eliminating wage discrimination against women could reduce family poverty by one half.

 

Spring 2000 Quarterly Newsletter
by (April 2000)

 

Unemployment Insurance Reform for the New Workforce
by Annisah Um’rani, Vicky Lovell, Ph.D. (March 2000)

Proceedings of the Strategy Forum for Improving Unemployment Insurance Policies to Benefit Women, Low-Wage and Contingent Workers, sponsored by IWPR and the National Employment Law Project.

 

Why Privatizing Social Security Would Hurt Women
by Catherine Hill, Ph.D. (March 2000)

Social Security reform is a women’s issue. Women make up 60 percent of Social Security beneficiaries, and they depend more heavily on Social Security than men do for their income in retirement. Half of the women aged 65 and older would be poor if not for Social Security. For 25 percent of elderly women who live alone, Social Security is their only source of income. (For an explanation of the benefits for women under the current Social Security system, see Table 1.)

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Strengthening Social Security for Women--A Report from the Working Conference on Women and Social Security
by Heidi Hartmann and Catherine Hill with Lisa Witter (March 2000)

This report is from the 1999 Working Conference on Women and Social Security. It presents recommendations on how to close Social Security's projected solvency gap as well as options to strengthen Social Security for women and families.

Report, 22 pages
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