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Publications

IWPR publishes its research in formats ranging from short fact sheets to longer form research reports. The Institute publishes on topics addressing the policy needs of women, including pay equity, retirement security, family leave, paid sick days, and employment.

For a full overview of our research areas and to view publications by topic, please visit our Initiatives area. All publications are available for free download on our website or you may choose to buy them through the Google Checkout icon to the right of the publication listing.  To request a publication by phone or e-mail, please contact Mallory Mpare at 202-785-5100 or mpare@iwpr.org.

Browse our publications below or use our Publication Finder to search for what you're looking for.

Latest Reports from IWPR

The Status of Women in Arizona, 2002: Highlights
by (August 2002)

 

The Status of Women in Alaska, 2002: Highlights
by (August 2002)

 

The Status of Women in Alabama, 2002: Highlights
by (August 2002)

 

The Status of Women in Massachusetts
by Amy Caizza, Ph.D. (August 2002)

During the twentieth century, women made significant economic, political, and social advances, but they are far from enjoying gender equality. Throughout the United States, women earn less than men, are seriously underrepresented in political office, and make up a disproportionate share of people in poverty. Even in areas where there have been significant advances in women's status, rates of progress are slow. For example, at the rate of progress achieved over the past ten years, women will not achieve wage parity for more than 60 years. If women's representation in Congress changes at the rate it did during the 1990s, it will take more than a century to achieve equality in political representation.

 

The Status of Women in Rhode Island
by Amy Caizza, Ph.D. (August 2002)

During the twentieth century, women made significant economic, political, and social advances, but they are far from enjoying gender equality. Throughout the United States, women earn less than men, are seriously under represented in political office, and make up a disproportionate share of people in poverty. Even in areas where there have been significant advances in women's status, rates of progress are slow. For example, at the rate of progress achieved over the past ten years, women will not achieve wage parity for more than 60 years. If women's representation in Congress changes at the rate it did during the 1990s, it will take more than a century to achieve equality in political representation.

 

The Status of Women in South Carolina
by Amy Caizza, Ph.D. (August 2002)

During the twentieth century, women made significant economic, political, and social advances, but they are far from enjoying gender equality. Throughout the United States, women earn less than men, are seriously under represented in political office, and make up a disproportionate share of people in poverty. Even in areas where there have been significant advances in women's status, rates of progress are slow. For example, at the rate of progress achieved over the past ten years, women will not achieve wage parity for more than 60 years. If women's representation in Congress changes at the rate it did during the 1990s, it will take more than a century to achieve equality in political representation.

 

The Status of Women in West Virginia
by Amy Caizza, Ph.D. (August 2002)

During the twentieth century, women made significant economic, political, and social advances, but they are far from enjoying gender equality. Throughout the United States, women earn less than men, are seriously under represented in political office, and make up a disproportionate share of people in poverty. Even in areas where there have been significant advances in women's status, rates of progress are slow. For example, at the rate of progress achieved over the past ten years, women will not achieve wage parity for more than 60 years. If women's representation in Congress changes at the rate it did during the 1990s, it will take more than a century to achieve equality in political representation.

 

The Status of Women in Missouri
by Amy Caizza, Ph.D. (August 2002)

During the twentieth century, women made significant economic, political, and social advances, but they are far from enjoying gender equality. Throughout the United States, women earn less than men, are seriously under represented in political office, and make up a disproportionate share of people in poverty. Even in areas where there have been significant advances in women's status, rates of progress are slow. For example, at the rate of progress achieved over the past ten years, women will not achieve wage parity for more than 60 years. If women's representation in Congress changes at the rate it did during the 1990s, it will take more than a century to achieve equality in political representation.

 

The Status of Women in Wisconsin
by Amy Caizza, Ph.D. (August 2002)

During the twentieth century, women made significant economic, political, and social advances, but they are far from enjoying gender equality. Throughout the United States, women earn less than men, are seriously under represented in political office, and make up a disproportionate share of people in poverty. Even in areas where there have been significant advances in women's status, rates of progress are slow. For example, at the rate of progress achieved over the past ten years, women will not achieve wage parity for more than 60 years. If women's representation in Congress changes at the rate it did during the 1990s, it will take more than a century to achieve equality in political representation.

 

The Status of Women in Kansas
by Amy Caizza, Ph.D. (August 2002)

During the twentieth century, women made significant economic, political, and social advances, but they are far from enjoying gender equality. Throughout the United States, women earn less than men, are seriously under represented in political office, and make up a disproportionate share of people in poverty. Even in areas where there have been significant advances in women's status, rates of progress are slow. For example, at the rate of progress achieved over the past ten years, women will not achieve wage parity for more than 60 years. If women's representation in Congress changes at the rate it did during the 1990s, it will take more than a century to achieve equality in political representation.

 

The Status of Women in Iowa
by Amy Caizza, Ph.D. (August 2002)

During the twentieth century, women made significant economic, political, and social advances, but they are far from enjoying gender equality. Throughout the United States, women earn less than men, are seriously underrepresented in political office, and make up a disproportionate share of people in poverty. Even in areas where there have been significant advances in women's status, rates of progress are slow. For example, at the rate of progress achieved over the past ten years, women will not achieve wage parity for more than 60 years. If women's representation in Congress changes at the rate it did during the 1990s, it will take more than a century to achieve equality in political representation.

 

Status of Women in the States 2002 Appendices
by Amy Caizza, Ph.D. (August 2002)

 

The Status of Women in Alabama
by Amy Caizza, Ph.D. (August 2002)

During the twentieth century, women made significant economic, political, and social advances, but they are far from enjoying gender equality. Throughout the United States, women earn less than men, are seriously underrepresented in political office, and make up a disproportionate share of people in poverty. Even in areas where there have been significant advances in women's status, rates of progress are slow. For example, at the rate of progress achieved over the past ten years, women will not achieve wage parity for more than 60 years. If women's representation in Congress changes at the rate it did during the 1990s, it will take more than a century to achieve equality in political representation.

 

The Status of Women in Wisconsin, 2002: Highlights
by (August 2002)

 

The Status of Women in West Virginia, 2002: Highlights
by (August 2002)

 

The Status of Women in Washington, 2002: Highlights
by (August 2002)

 

The Status of Women in Virginia, 2002: Highlights
by (August 2002)

 

The Status of Women in Vermont, 2002: Highlights
by (August 2002)

 

The Status of Women in Utah, 2002: Highlights
by (August 2002)

 

The Status of Women in Texas, 2002: Highlights
by (August 2002)

 
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