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Publications

IWPR publishes its research in formats ranging from short fact sheets to longer form research reports. The Institute publishes on topics addressing the policy needs of women, including pay equity, retirement security, family leave, paid sick days, and employment.

For a full overview of our research areas and to view publications by topic, please visit our Initiatives area. All publications are available for free download on our website or you may choose to buy them through the Google Checkout icon to the right of the publication listing.  To request a publication by phone or e-mail, please contact Mallory Mpare at 202-785-5100 or mpare@iwpr.org.

Browse our publications below or use our Publication Finder to search for what you're looking for.

Latest Reports from IWPR

Recently Proposed Legislation Affecting Social Security (Appendix to IWPR #D504)
by Mary Sykes and Susan Andrzejewski (July 2014)

Appendix II: Legislation Affection Social Security Introduced in the 110th-113th Congresses (Appendix to Enhancing Social Security for Women and other Vulnerable Americans: What the Experts Say)

 

Enhancing Social Security for Women and other Vulnerable Americans: What the Experts Say
by Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D. (July 2014)

This report was conducted by Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) to gather expert opinion about the likely direction and timing of new legislation affecting Social Security and to identify opportunities to raise the special concerns of women and other vulnerable populations in future legislative debates, so that their needs can be addressed.

 

As Foreign-Born Worker Population Grows, Many Lack Paid Sick Days
by Alex Wang, Jeffrey Hayes, and Liz Ben - Ishai (July 2014)

Research demonstrates that low-wage workers and people of color are least likely to have access to paid sick days.This brief builds on previous research to provide an analysis of immigrant access to sick days using data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS).

 

Job Growth in June Strong for Women and Men; Men Still Short 582,000 Jobs from Pre-Recession Peak
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (July 2014)

According to an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the July employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), although the total number of jobs lost in the recession has been recovered (138,780,000 jobs in June 2014 vs 138,350,000 jobs in December 2007 when the recession began), men are still short 582,000 from their pre-recession peak. Women regained their peak in September 2013. In June, women gained 158,000 jobs on nonfarm payrolls, while men gained 130,000 for an increase of 288,000 total jobs in June. The unemployment rate decreased to 6.1 percent in June from 6.3 percent in May.

 

Occupational Segregation and the Gender Wage Gap: A Job Half Done
by Ariane Hegewisch and Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D. (June 2014)

This report was prepared by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) as a part of a series of Scholars’ Papers sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor Women's Bureau in commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of American Women: Report of the President’s Commission on the Status of Women, 1963.

 

Paid Parental Leave in the United States: What the Data Tell Us about Access, Usage, and Economic and Health Benefits
by Barbara Gault, Ph.D., Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., Ariane Hegewisch, Jessica Milli, Ph.D., Lindsey Reichlin (June 2014)

This paper was prepared by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) as a part of a series of Scholars’ Papers sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor Women's Bureau in commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of American Women: Report of the President’s Commission on the Status of Women, 1963.

 
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Pathways to Postsecondary Education for Pregnant and Parenting Teens
by Cynthia B. Costello, Ph.D. (June 2014)

This report examines trends in educational attainment for pregnant and parenting teens, as well as programmatic approaches and policy initiatives for improving their high school completion and college enrollment rates. This report is a product of IWPR’s Student Parent Success Initiative, a multifaceted project designed to share knowledge, raise awareness, and improve public policies to support positive outcomes for low-income student parents seeking higher education.

 
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Quality Jobs and Supports Build Strong Workplaces
by Barbara Gault, Ph.D. (June 2014)

Testimony of Barbara Gault, Ph.D.before the Joint Economic Committee June 18, 2014

 
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Spring 2014 Quarterly Newsletter
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (June 2014)

 

Access to Paid Sick Leave in Oakland, California
by Jessica Milli (June 2014)

This briefing paper presents estimates of access to paid sick leave in Oakland by age, sex, race and ethnicity, industry, and hourly earnings through analysis of government data sources, including the 2011–2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), and the 2012 American Community Survey (ACS).

 

Securing a Better Future: A Portrait of Female Students in Mississippi’s Community Colleges
by Cynthia Hess, Ph.D., Sylvia Krohn, Lindsey Reichlin, Stephanie Román, and Barbara Gault, Ph.D. (June 2014)

This report presents findings from a survey of female community college students in Mississippi conducted by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) and commissioned by the Women’s Foundation of Mississippi. The survey is designed to identify supports and practices that can help women succeed in community college and attain economic security. It explores women’s motivations for pursuing college, their personal and career goals, their support needs, and the economic, health, and time challenges that they experience. The survey was designed as a part of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research’s Student Parent Success Initiative, which provides information and tools to promote the success of student parents in postsecondary education.

 

Men Still 699,000 Jobs Short of Employment Recovery; Strong Job Gains in May for Men and Women in Female-Dominated Industries
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (June 2014)

According to an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the June employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), although the total number of jobs lost in the recession has been recovered (138,463,000 jobs in May 2014 vs. 138,350,000 jobs in December 2007, when the recession began), men are still short 699,000 from their prerecession peak. Women regained their peak in August 2013. In May, women gained 86,000 jobs on nonfarm payrolls, while men gained 131,000 for an increase of 217,000 total jobs in May. In the past year, men have gained more than half the new jobs added (53 percent vs. 47 percent for women).

 

Building Women’s Political Careers: Strengthening the Pipeline to Higher Office
by Denise L. Baer, Heidi I. Hartmann (May 2014)

This report was prepared by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) for Political Parity, a program of the Hunt Alternatives Fund. The report analyzes results from interviews with experienced candidates and officeholders and several focus groups with elected state legislators, young elected officials, and congressional staff members to investigate how women make the decision to run and how they develop their political careers, with a focus on seeking or achieving higher office. All Political Parity publications are available at www.politicalparity.org.

 

Appendix E, Building Women’s Political Careers: Strengthening the Pipeline to Higher Office
by Denise L. Baer (May 2014)

These protocols were used in a project conducted by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research for the Hunt Alternatives Fund, for which Denise Baer served as consulting project director. This appendix represents pages E1-32 of the final report of study results: Building Women’s Political Careers: Strengthening the Pipeline to Higher Office, written by Denise L. Baer and Heidi I. Hartmann.

 

Women Gained 166,000 Jobs in April; Men Gained 51 Percent of Jobs Added in the Past Year
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (May 2014)

According to an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the May employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), women gained 166,000 jobs on nonfarm payrolls in April, while men gained 122,000 for an increase of 288,000 total jobs in April. Women’s employment growth was strongest in Professional and Business Services (42,000 jobs gained by women), Education and Health Services (33,000 jobs gained by women), Leisure and Hospitality (27,000 jobs gained by women), Retail Trade (24,000 jobs gained by women, and Government (13,000 jobs gained by women).

 

The Well-Being of Women in Utah: An Overview
by Cynthia Hess, Ph.D. and Claudia Williams (May 2014)

This briefing paper provides an overview of how women in Utah fare in key dimensions of their lives: earnings, education, and economic security; physical and emotional health and safety; and political leadership and participation. While it lies beyond the scope of the paper to address other key aspects of women’s overall well-being—such as faith and spirituality, family and friendships, civic and community involvement, and sports and fitness—the data provided here identify important areas of progress and challenges for Utah women and suggest policy directions that would benefit the state as a whole.

 

College Affordability for Low-Income Adults: Improving Returns on Investment for Families and Society
by Barbara Gault, Ph.D., Lindsey Reichlin, M.A., Stephanie Román (April 2014)

This report was prepared by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) as a part of a series of papers on defining college affordability sponsored by the Lumina Foundation. The report examines how efforts to understand and improve college affordability can be informed by the experiences and circumstances of low-income adults, students of color, and students with dependent children.

 

The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation and by Race and Ethnicity, 2013
by Ariane Hegewisch and Stephanie Keller Hudiburg (April 2014)

Women’s median earnings are lower than men’s in nearly all occupations, whether they work in occupations predominantly done by women, occupations predominantly done by men, or occupations with a more even mix of men and women. Data for both women’s and men’s median weekly earnings for full-time work are available for 112 occupations ; there are only three occupations in which women have higher median weekly earnings than men. In 101 of the 112 occupations, the gender earnings ratio of women’s median weekly earnings to men’s is 0.95 or lower (that is, a wage gap of at least 5 cents per dollar earned by men); in 17 of these occupations the gender earnings ratio is lower than 0.75 (that is, a wage gap of more than 25 cents per dollar earned by men).

 

Women Gained 99,000 Jobs in March
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (April 2014)

According to an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the April employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), women gained 99,000 jobs on nonfarm payrolls in March, while men gained 93,000 for an increase of 192,000 jobs in March. In March, women’s employment growth was strongest in Professional and Business Services (29,000 jobs gained by women), Retail Trade (26,000 jobs gained by women), Education and Health Services (24,000 jobs gained by women), and Leisure and Hospitality (15,000 jobs gained by women).

 

The Gender Wage Gap: 2013; Differences by Race and Ethnicity, No Growth in Real Wages for Women
by Ariane Hegewisch, Claudia Williams, Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., and Stephanie Keller Hudiburg (March 2014)

The gender wage gap in the United States has not seen significant improvement in recent years, and remains a reality for women across racial and ethnic groups. In 2013, the ratio of women’s to men’s median weekly full-time earnings was 82.1 percent, an increase of more than one percentage point since 2012,when the ratio was 80.9 percent (but still slightly lower than the 2011 ratio of 82.2 percent). This corresponds to a weekly gender wage gap of 17.9 percent. Real earnings have remained largely unchanged since 2012; women’s median weekly earnings increased by $5 to $706 in 2013; men’s median weekly earnings increased to $860, a marginal increase of $7 compared with 2012.

 
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