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Publications

IWPR publishes its research in formats ranging from short fact sheets to longer form research reports. The Institute publishes on topics addressing the policy needs of women, including pay equity, retirement security, family leave, paid sick days, and employment.

For a full overview of our research areas and to view publications by topic, please visit our Initiatives area. All publications are available for free download on our website or you may choose to buy them through the Google Checkout icon to the right of the publication listing.  To request a publication by phone or e-mail, please contact Mallory Mpare at 202-785-5100 or mpare@iwpr.org.

Browse our publications below or use our Publication Finder to search for what you're looking for.

Latest Reports from IWPR

Women and Men Share Stronger Job Gains in December—Women’s Unemployment Rate Is at 4.8 Percent; Men’s at 5.2 Percent
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (January 2016)

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the January employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) finds that women gained 141,000 jobs and men gained 151,000 for a total of 292,000 jobs added in December. Revisions to preliminary estimates of nonfarm payroll employment for October and November improved the picture for men adding 121,000 jobs to previous releases. Those revisions reduced the number of jobs added for women by 12,000 in October and November. The overall unemployment rate remained steady at 5.0 percent in November and December.

 

Brief of Institute for Women’s Policy Research, National Association of Social Workers, Texas Chapter of National Association of Social Workers, and Re:Gender as Amici Curiae In Support of Petitioners (Whole Woman’s Health v. Cole)
by Institute for Women's Policy Research, National Association of Social Workers, Texas Chapter of National Association of Social Workers, and Re:Gender (January 2016)

Amici the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, the National Association of Social Workers, the Texas Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers, and Re:Gender (formerly the National Council for Research on Women) are organizations committed to improving the health and well-being of women and their families nationally and in the state of Texas. They have submitted an amicus brief in support of the petitioners in Whole Woman’s Health v. Cole that sets forth the particularly poor health and well-being outcomes facing women and their families in the state of Texas, including higher cancer incidence and mortality rates, lower life expectancy, and lack of access to affordable health and prenatal care. The brief explains how these poor health outcomes in part reflect policy choices of the Texas legislature. It concludes by arguing that, although Texas has justified H.B. 2 as legislation intended to improve the health of women in the state, Texas’s track record suggests otherwise, and the Supreme Court should thus take into account Texas’s failure to implement various health promotion policies as it assesses whether the stated purpose behind H.B. 2 withstands constitutional scrutiny.

 

Quarterly Newsletter--Fall 2015
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (December 2015)

 

Men Gain Three Out of Four New Jobs in November —Overall Continued Strong Jobs Growth; Women Gained Majority of Jobs in Past Year
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (December 2015)

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the December employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) finds that women gained 54,000 jobs and men gained 157,000 for a total of 211,000 jobs added in November. Revisions to preliminary estimates of nonfarm payroll employment for September and October improved the picture for men adding 52,000 jobs to previous releases. Those revisions reduced the number of jobs added for women by 17,000 in September and October. The overall unemployment rate remained steady at 5.0 percent in October and November.

 

Strong Job Growth in October Lowers Unemployment Rate to 5 Percent: Women Gain 158,000 Jobs and Men Gain 113,000 Jobs
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (November 2015)

According to an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the November employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), women gained 158,000 jobs and men gained 113,000 for a total of 271,000 jobs added in October. The overall unemployment rate declined to 5.0 percent in October from 5.1 percent in September.

 

The Best and Worst States Overall for Women in 2015
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (November 2015)

This Fact Sheet is based on findings from The Status of Women in the States: 2015, a comprehensive national report that presents and analyzes data for all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

 

Access to Paid Sick Time in Minneapolis, Minnesota
by Jessica Milli, Ph.D. (October 2015)

Approximately 42 percent of workers in Minneapolis, Minnesota lack paid sick time, and low-income and part-time workers are even less likely to be covered. Access to paid sick time promotes safe and healthy work environments by reducing the spread of illness and workplace injuries, reduces health care costs, and supports children and families by helping parents to fulfill their caregiving responsibilities. This briefing paper presents estimates of access to paid sick time in Minneapolis by sex, race and ethnicity, occupation, part/full-time employment status, and personal earnings through analysis of government data sources, including the 2011–2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the 2011-2013 American Community Survey (ACS).

 

The Economic Status of Women in Colorado
by Yana Mayayeva, Julie Anderson, Cynthia Hess, and Jessica Milli (October 2015)

This briefing paper assesses women’s economic status in Colorado, drawing comparisons with other states in the Mountain West region and the nation overall. It examines how women in Colorado fare on two composite indices—Employment & Earnings, and Poverty & Opportunity—and their component indicators. (For more on these indicators and IWPR’s Status of Women in the States initiative, see Appendix I or visit www.statusofwomendata.org.) The briefing paper also considers how women’s status in Colorado has changed over the last decade, highlights differences across age and racial and ethnic groups, and identifies policy recommendations to further improve women’s status.

 

Reproductive Health and Women’s Educational Attainment: Women’s Funds’ Strategies to Improve Outcomes for Women
by Lindsey Reichlin, M.A., and Justine Augeri, Ph.D. (October 2015)

This paper offers an overview of the significance and status of access to reproductive health rights and services in the United States today. It focuses particularly on how expanding access to family planning methods and information can improve young women’s prospects for economic security in adulthood, largely through access to education. In addition to addressing the need for reproductive services to promote women’s educational attainment, the report discusses how to support college students who already have children, and profiles the efforts of women’s funds to ensure access to services that promote reproductive health and allow low-income parents to attend and succeed at postsecondary education.

 

Amidst Disappointing Job Growth, Men Gain 3 of 5 Jobs Added in September
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (October 2015)

According to an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the October employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), women gained 60,000 jobs and men gained 82,000 for a total of 142,000 jobs added in September. The overall unemployment rate remained steady at 5.1 percent in August and September.

 

The Gender Wage Gap: 2014
by Ariane Hegewisch and Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D. (September 2015)

The ratio of women’s and men’s median annual earnings was 78.6 percent for full-time/year-round workers in 2014. This means the gender wage gap for full-time/year-round workers is 21.4 percent. Women’s median annual earnings in 2014 were $39,621 compared with $50,383 for men. Neither women’s nor men’s earnings significantly improved compared to 2013. If the pace of change in the annual earnings ratio continues at the same rate as it has since 1960, it will take another 45 years, until 2059, for men and women to reach parity.

 

Women’s Median Earnings as a Percent of Men’s Median Earnings, 1960-2014 (Full-time, Year-round Workers) with Projection for Pay Equity in 2059
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (September 2015)

If current trends continue, women will not see equal pay with men until 2059.

 
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Access to Paid Sick Time in Prince George’s County, Maryland
by Jessica Milli, Ph.D. and Daria Ulybina (September 2015)

Approximately 43 percent of private sector workers living in Prince George’s County, Maryland lack paid sick time, and among those, low-income and part-time workers are especially unlikely to be covered. Access to paid sick time promotes safe and healthy work environments by reducing the spread of illness and workplace injuries, reduces health care costs, and supports children and families by helping parents to fulfill their caregiving responsibilities. This briefing paper presents estimates of access to paid sick time in Prince George’s County by sex, race and ethnicity, occupation, part/full-time employment status, and personal earnings through analysis of government data sources, including the 2011–2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the 2013 American Community Survey (ACS).

 

Unemployment Rate for Women and Men of Color Remains Higher Than for White Women and Men
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (September 2015)

According to the September employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Black women and men have the highest levels of unemployment, while whites have the lowest. In April 2009 unemployment peaked at 18.3 percent for Black men and remains high at 9.2 percent in August 2015. Black women fared somewhat better compared with Black men in the early recovery, but their unemployment rates have fallen more slowly than Black men’s and they are separated by slightly more 2 than one percentage point in the most recent employment data, 8.1 percent for Black women and 9.2 percent for Black men.

 

Women Gain 107,000 Jobs in August and Men Gain 66,000 Jobs
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (September 2015)

According to an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the September employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), women gained 107,000 jobs and men gained 66,000 for a total of 173,000 jobs added in August. The overall unemployment rate decreased to 5.1 percent in August from 5.3 percent in July.

 

The Union Advantage for Women
by (August 2015)

This briefing paper presents an analysis of women’s union membership and the union wage and benefit advantage for women by state and by race/ethnicity. It is based on an analysis of the Current Population Survey. Wage and benefit data are for all workers covered by a union contract, irrespective of their membership in a union.

 

Get to the Bricks: The Experiences of Black Women from New Orleans Public Housing After Hurricane Katrina
by Jane Henrici, Ph.D., with Chandra Childers, Ph.D., and Elyse Shaw, M.A. (August 2015)

Get to the Bricks: The Experiences of Black Women from New Orleans Public Housing After Hurricane Katrina presents the results of qualitative research conducted with 184 low-income black women who lived in public housing prior to Hurricane Katrina and the flooding of New Orleans, and who were displaced by the hurricane and the closure and demolition of their housing. This report attempts to answer a series of interconnected questions regarding the challenges that women in public housing faced when trying to evacuate, while displaced, and when trying to return or settle in new communities. The study explores the reasoning behind their choices to either return to New Orleans or remain displaced and the resources that were or were not avilable to these women as they attempted to make the best decisions for themselves and their families after such an enormous disaster. This report recommends a more holistic approach to disaster relief efforts in the United States, including coordinated services and policies that consider the needs of the most vulnerable portions of the population. The report is part of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research’s work, begun in 2005, focusing on women from different communities, backgrounds, and experiences along the U.S. Gulf Coast following the Katrina-related disasters. The research is also one of a set of investigations conducted as a part of the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) Katrina Task Force.

 

Nearly Half of Currently Exempt Women Workers Aged 18 to 34 Will Gain Coverage Under DOL’s New Proposed Overtime Salary Threshold
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (August 2015)

When looking at all newly covered female salaried workers by age, Millennial women workers, aged 18-34 years old, will benefit most from an increase in access to overtime pay. As shown in Figure 1, comparing different age groups, the greatest percentage increase in newly covered workers will be seen among Millennial women workers. Forty-eight percent of formerly exempt Millennial women will be covered, compared with 32 percent of working women aged 35-49, 31 percent of working women aged 50-64, and 31 percent of working women aged 65 and older. These newly covered include those currently working overtime and those not currently working overtime.

 

How the New Overtime Rule Will Help Women & Families
by Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner, Hero Ashman, Jeffrey Hayes, Ph.D., and Hailey Nguyen (August 2015)

This report, a collaboration between the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) and MomsRising, is an analysis of the U.S. Department of Labor’s proposed change to the overtime threshold and how this change will affect working women. The report focuses on the 5.9 million workers who would be “newly covered” by the proposed increase and explores the differences in the impacts of the higher earnings threshold by sex, and among women by race/ethnicity, household type, and occupation.

 

Women Gain 115,000 Jobs in July and Men Gain 100,000 Jobs
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (August 2015)

According to an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the August employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), women gained 115,000 jobs and men gained 100,000 for a total of 215,000 jobs added in July. The overall unemployment rate remained unchanged at 5.3 percent from June.

 
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