Informing policy. Inspiring change. Improving lives.
1200 18th Street NW, Suite 301
Washington, DC 20036
202 785-5100
iwpr@iwpr.org

Publications

IWPR publishes its research in formats ranging from short fact sheets to longer form research reports. The Institute publishes on topics addressing the policy needs of women, including pay equity, retirement security, family leave, paid sick days, and employment.

For a full overview of our research areas and to view publications by topic, please visit our Initiatives area. All publications are available for free download on our website or you may choose to buy them through the Google Checkout icon to the right of the publication listing.  To request a publication by phone or e-mail, please contact Mallory Mpare at 202-785-5100 or mpare@iwpr.org.

Browse our publications below or use our Publication Finder to search for what you're looking for.

Latest Reports from IWPR

The Status of Women in the Triangle Metropolitan Area, North Carolina
by Ariane Hegewisch, Rhiana Gunn-Wright, and Claudia Williams (January 2013)

This briefing paper provides basic information about the status of women in the Triangle area, focusing on women’s earnings and workforce participation, level of education, poverty, access to child care, and health status. It also provides background demographic information about women in the region.

 

The Status of Women in the Greensboro Metropolitan Area, North Carolina
by Ariane Hegewisch, Rhiana Gunn-Wright, and Claudia Williams (January 2013)

Women in the Greensboro area, and in North Carolina as a whole, have made much progress during the last few decades. The majority of women work—many in professional jobs—and women are essential to the economic health of their communities. Yet, there are some ways in which women’s status still lags behind men’s, and not all women are prospering equally. This fact sheet provides basic information about the status of women in the Greensboro metropolitan area—including Alamance, Davidson, Davie, Forsyth, Guilford, Randolph, Stokes, and Yadkin counties—focusing on women’s earnings and workforce participation, level of education, poverty, access to child care, and health status. It also provides background demographic information about women in the region.

 

Access to Paid Sick Days in Portland, Oregon
by Isela Bañuelos and Claudia Williams (December 2012)

Access to paid sick days promotes healthy work environments by reducing the spread of illnesses, increasing productivity, and supporting work and family balance. Paid sick days allow employees to take time off work to recover from personal illnesses and tend to family members’ health without the fear of monetary or other negative consequences. Despite the importance of paid sick days, a large proportion of workers in the Portland, Oregon, area receive no paid sick time at all. This fact sheet presents paid sick days access rates by occupation, sex, race and ethnicity, and personal income in the Portland area. The Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR) derived these estimates through analysis of government data sources including the National Health Interview Survey and the American Community Survey.

 
Preview not available

The Gender Wage Gap in New York State and Its Solutions
by Ariane Hegewish, Jeff Hayes, Heidi Hartmann, Jocelyn Fischer, Claudia Williams, Justine Augeri (December 2012)

 

Women Have Regained Greater Share of Jobs Lost in Recession Than Men: Women Gain 6 Out of 10 Jobs Added in November
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (December 2012)

According to IWPR analysis of the November employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), job growth improved, with 146,000 jobs added to nonfarm payrolls. Job growth was strong for women (91,000 jobs) and men (55,000 jobs).

 

The Status of Women in Guilford County, North Carolina
by Cynthia Hess, Ph.D. and Maureen Sarna (November 2012)

Women in Guilford County, and in North Carolina as a whole, have made significant progress in the last few decades. The majority of women work—many in professional and managerial jobs—and women are a mainstay of the economic health of their communities. Yet, there are some ways in which women’s status still lags behind men’s, and not all women are prospering equally. This briefing paper provides basic information about the status of women in Guilford County, focusing on women’s earnings and workforce participation, level of education, poverty, access to child care, and health status. It also provides background demographic information about women in the region.

 

Job Growth Improves in October for Both Women and Men: Women Gain 53 Percent of Jobs Added, Women Now Have Net Job Growth Since February 2009
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (November 2012)

According to IWPR analysis of the October employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), job growth improved in October with women gaining 53 percent of jobs added to nonfarm payrolls. Job growth was strong for both women (91,000 jobs) and men (80,000 jobs) for a total of 171,000 jobs added.

 

Using Research on the Status of Women to Improve Public Policies in the Middle East and North Africa: A Capacity-Building Toolkit for Nongovernmental Organizations
by Denise L. Baer, Ph.D., Jane Henrici, Ph.D., Layla Moughari, Barbara Gault, Ph.D. (October 2012)

This toolkit provides methods, techniques and tips for individuals and organizations to undertake and use research on the status of women as a mechanism for positive change in the lives of women, their families and communities. It was designed as a part of a larger project, the Status of Women in the Middle East and North Africa (SWMENA).

 

The Status of Women in North Carolina: Executive Summary
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (October 2012)

The status of women in North Carolina reveals both women’s progress over the last few decades and places where their advancement has slowed or stalled. A report from the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR), The Status of Women in North Carolina, shows that women are well-represented in the state’s elective executive positions and hold a higher proportion of state legislature seats than in 1996; have experienced a narrowing of the gender wage gap; and are much more likely now than 20 years ago to work in managerial or professional positions and to earn a bachelor’s degree or higher. In addition, women in North Carolina are the equal or main bread winner in close to four out of ten families with children. The teen pregnancy rate in the state has also declined dramatically in recent years, and North Carolina’s women are more likely to receive certain preventive health procedures, such as mammograms, than women in the nation overall.

 

Women Gain Half of Jobs Added in September: Net Job Growth During Obama Years
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (October 2012)

According to IWPR analysis of the September employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), job growth continued in September with 114,000 jobs added to nonfarm payrolls. Job growth was evenly divided with women and men each gaining 57,000 jobs. As in past months, most of the job growth was in the private sector, but jobs in the public sector grew slightly, 7,000 new jobs for men and 3,000 new jobs for women.

 

Summer/Fall 2012 Newsletter
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (September 2012)

 

The Gender Wage Gap: 2011
by Ariane Hegewisch and Angela Edwards (September 2012)

The ratio of women’s and men’s median annual earnings was 77.0 for full-time/year-round workers in 2011, essentially unchanged from 77.4 in 2010. (This means the gender wage gap for full-time/year-round workers is now 23 percent.) During the last decade the wage gap narrowed by less than half of one percentage point. In the previous decade, between 1991 and 2000, it closed by almost four, and in the decade prior to that, 1981 and 1990, by over ten percentage points.

 

103,000 New Jobs in the Private Sector: Women Continue to Lose Government Jobs
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (September 2012)

According to IWPR analysis of the August employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), private sector job growth continued in August with 103,000 jobs added to nonfarm payrolls. However, BLS reported that there were 7,000 fewer jobs in government resulting in a net total of 96,000 jobs added to nonfarm payrolls in August. Of these, women gained 43,000 jobs, or 45 percent of the total, and men gained 53,000 jobs.

 

Job Growth and Unemployment for Men and Women in Pennsylvania, 2007 to 2011
by Ariane Hegewisch, Anlan Zhang, Jeffrey Hayes, Ph.D., and Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D. (September 2012)

Since the beginning of the Great Recession in December of 2007 both women and men in Pennsylvania have experienced dramatic job losses and steep increases in unemployment. Almost three years after the official end of the recession, neither women’s nor men’s employment has reached pre-recession levels, but men’s employment gain has been considerably stronger than women’s. The gap between the number of women and men employed in Pennsylvania was wider at the end of 2011 than it was at the outset of the Great Recession. Women have not gained in the recovery relative to men.

 

Recommendations for an Evaluation of the District of Columbia’s Paid Sick Days Law
by Kevin Miller, Ph.D. (September 2012)

This briefing paper presents recommendations for the evaluation and report on the Accrued Sick and Safe Leave Act of 2008.1 One provision of the Act, which mandates that employers in the District of Columbia provide paid sick days to some employees, requires the Auditor of the District of Columbia to prepare and submit a report on the Act’s impact.

 

Key Findings on the Economic Status of Women in North Carolina
by Cynthia Hess, Ph.D., and Ariane Hegewisch (August 2012)

Women in North Carolina have made significant social and economic advances in recent decades, but the need for further progress remains. A forthcoming report from the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR), The Status of Women in North Carolina, shows that many of North Carolina’s women are vulnerable to challenges such as unemployment, a persistent wage gap, poverty, and the high cost of child care. In addition, women in the state experience stubborn disparities in opportunities and outcomes—disparities that exist among women of different race and ethnic groups as well as among women from various geographic areas within the state. Addressing these challenges and disparities is essential to promoting the well-being and vibrancy of North Carolina’s many communities.

 

Women and Men in the Recovery: Where the Jobs Are
by Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., Jocelyn Fischer, and Jacqui Logan (August 2012)

 

The Status of Women and Girls in New Haven, Connecticut
by Cynthia Hess, Ph.D., Rhiana Gunn-Wright, and Claudia Williams (August 2012)

This report is the result of conversations over nearly two years among women leaders in New Haven about the growing need for data on women and girls in New Haven. The report has four goals: 1) to provide baseline information on women and girls in New Haven; 2) to inform policy and program priorities for women and girls in New Haven; 3) to provide easily accessible data on women and girls in New Haven; and 4) to create a platform for advocacy and dialogue on issues affecting women and girls in New Haven.

#R355, Report, 136 pages
$20.00
Quantity:

How Increasing Breastfeeding Rates Will Affect WIC Expenditures: Saving Money While Meeting the Goals of Healthy People 2020
by Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., Jeffrey Hayes, Ph.D., and Youngmin Yi (August 2012)

This report analyzes the cost structure of WIC food packages in relation to breastfeeding, including estimates of total spending on each of the different packages, and estimates of total costs from simulations if Healthy People 2020 breastfeeding goals were reached.

#B307, Report, 35 pages
$10.00
Quantity:

163,000 New Jobs in July: Over Half Go to Women
by Instiute for Women's Policy Research (August 2012)

According to IWPR analysis of the August employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), job growth continued in July with 163,000 jobs added to nonfarm payrolls. In July women gained 86,000 jobs, or 53 percent of the total, and men gained 77,000 jobs.

 
Document Actions
Go to Home Page