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Publications

IWPR publishes its research in formats ranging from short fact sheets to longer form research reports. The Institute publishes on topics addressing the policy needs of women, including pay equity, retirement security, family leave, paid sick days, and employment.

For a full overview of our research areas and to view publications by topic, please visit our Initiatives area. All publications are available for free download on our website or you may choose to buy them through the Google Checkout icon to the right of the publication listing.  To request a publication by phone or e-mail, please contact Mallory Mpare at 202-785-5100 or mpare@iwpr.org.

Browse our publications below or use our Publication Finder to search for what you're looking for.

Latest Reports from IWPR

Access to Earned Sick Days in Maryland
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (February 2013)

A new analysis by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) reveals that more than 700,000 private sector employees in Maryland lack even a single earned sick day. Access to earned sick days promotes healthy work environments by reducing the spread of illnesses, , increasing productivity, and supporting work and family balance. Earned sick days allow people to take time off work to recover from personal illnesses and to tend to family members’ health without the fear of lost pay or other negative consequences. This briefing paper presents estimates of earned sick days access rates in Maryland by occupation, by sex, race and ethnicity, and personal annual earnings, through analysis of government data sources, including the 2010–2011 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the 2011 American Community Survey (ACS).

 

Valuing Good Health in Maryland: The Costs and Benefits of Earned Sick Days
by Claudia Williams (February 2013)

The briefing paper uses data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, and the U.S. Census Bureau to evaluate costs and benefits of Maryland’s “Earned Sick and Safe Time Act.” It estimates how much ime off Maryland workers would use under the proposed policy and the costs to employers for that sick time. This analysis also uses findings from previous peer-reviewed research to estimate cost savings associated with the policy, through reduced turnover, reduced spread of contagious disease in the workplace, prevention of productivity losses from employees working while sick, minimized nursing-home stays, and reduced norovirus outbreaks in nursing homes. The study is one of a series of analyses by IWPR examining the effects of earned sick days policies.

 

The Status of Women in Cumberland County, North Carolina
by Cynthia Hess, Ph.D. and Claudia Williams (February 2013)

Women in Cumberland County, and in North Carolina as a whole, have made significant progress during the last few decades, but more remains to be done to elevate women’s status. The majority of women work—many in professional and managerial jobs—and women make important contributions to the economic health of their communities. Yet, in some ways women’s status still lags behind men’s, and not all women are prospering equally. This briefing paper provides basic information about the status of women in Cumberland County, focusing on women’s earnings and workforce participation, level of education, poverty, access to child care, and health status. It also provides basic demographic information about women in this area.

 

Improving Career Opportunities for Immigrant Women In-Home Care Workers
by Jane Henrici, Ph.D. (February 2013)

Improving Career Opportunities for Immigrant Women In-Home Care Workers is one of two IWPR studies focused on ways to improve labor conditions and rights among immigrant women in home care work. This report addresses the lack of employment options and career mobility that many foreign-born women who are care workers—particularly those with limited English proficiency—face within their jobs helping others. Using original expert interviews and an extensive review of the literature, IWPR’s research discusses the need to increase access to high-quality training that specifically targets the needs of immigrant women care workers. Such efforts can help them support themselves and their families through the critically valuable labor of providing assistance in homes to those who are disabled, chronically ill, or elderly and in need of help.

#I925, Report, 36 pages
$20.00
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Moderate Job Growth Continues for Women and Men: Revised Numbers Provide Brighter Picture of Recovery for Women
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (February 2013)

According to IWPR analysis of the January employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), released February 1, 2013, job growth was stronger for women (102,000 jobs) than men (55,000 jobs), for a total of 157,000 jobs added to nonfarm payrolls during the month of January.

 

Increasing Pathways to Legal Status for Immigrant In-Home Care Workers
by Cynthia Hess, Ph.D. and Jane Henrici, Ph.D. (February 2013)

This paper explores options for reforming the U.S. visa system to increase the pathways to legal status for undocumented immigrant women interested in providing long-term care for the elderly and for individuals with disabilities and chronic illnesses. Drawing on a review of relevant literature and consultations with experts, it examines the current visa options for obtaining legal status that allow for employment and the reasons these avenues do not meet the needs of in-home care workers.

#I924, Report, 35 pages
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The Status of Women in the Charlotte Metropolitan Area, North Carolina
by Cynthia Hess, P.D., Rhiana Gunn-Wright, and Youngmin Y (January 2013)

Women in the Charlotte metropolitan area, and in North Carolina as a whole, have made much progress during the last few decades. The majority of women work—many in professional jobs—and women are essential to the economic health of their communities. Yet, there are some ways in which women’s status still lags behind men’s, and not all women are prospering equally. This fact sheet provides basic information about the status of women the Charlotte area, focusing on women’s earnings and workforce participation, level of education, poverty, access to childcare, and health status. It also provides background demographic information about women in the region.

 

Valuing Good Health in Philadelphia: The Costs and Benefits of Paid Sick Days
by Clau (January 2013)

Policymakers across the country are increasingly interested in ensuring that workers can take paid time off when they are sick. In addition to concerns about workers’ ability to respond to their own health needs, there is growing recognition that, with so many dual-earner and single-parent families, family members’ health needs also sometimes require workers to take time off from their job. Allowing workers with contagious illness to avoid unnecessary contact with co-workers and customers has important public health benefits. Paid sick days also protect workers from being disciplined or fired when they are too sick to work, help families and communities economically by preventing lost income due to illness, and offer savings to employers by reducing turnover and minimizing absenteeism.

 
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Improving Outcomes for Marginalized Girls in the Secondary Education and Workforce Development Systems
by Rhiana Gunn-Wright and Barbara Gault, Ph.D. (January 2013)

This Article, published in the Georgetown Journal of Poverty Law and Policy, discusses the educational status of marginalized girls, outlines challenges that can undermine their success in school, presents promising educational and workforce development programs for marginalized girls at both the secondary and postsecondary levels, and provides recommendations for public policy solutions to improve their opportunities. To purchase pdf or printed copies of this article, please visit: https://articleworks.cadmus.com/geolaw/z5800213.html

 

The Status of Women in Western North Carolina
by Ariane Hegewisch, Rhiana Gunn-Wright, and Claudia Williams (January 2013)

Women in Western North Carolina, as in North Carolina as a whole, have made much progress during the last few decades. The majority of women work—many in professional and managerial jobs—and women are a mainstay of the economic health of their communities. Yet, there are some ways in which women’s status still lags behind men’s, and not all women are prospering equally. This briefing paper provides basic information about the status of women in Western North Carolina—including Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, Jackson, Macon, and Swain counties—focusing on women’s earnings and workforce participation, level of education, poverty, access to child care, and health status. It also provides background demographic information about women in the region.

 

The Status of Women in Alexander, Burke, and Caldwell Counties, North Carolina
by Cynthia Hess, Ph.D., and Youngmin Yi (January 2013)

Women in Alexander, Burke, and Caldwell counties, as in North Carolina as a whole, have made much progress during the last few decades, but more remains to be done to elevate women’s status. The majority of women work—many in professional and managerial jobs—and women are a mainstay of the economic health of their communities. Yet, there are ways in which women’s status still lags behind men’s, and not all women are prospering equally. This briefing paper provides information about the status of women in Alexander, Burke, and Caldwell counties, focusing on women’s earnings and workforce participation, level of education, poverty, access to child care, and health status. It also provides basic demographic information about women in this area.

 

The Status of Women in Buncombe County, North Carolina
by Cynthia Hess, Ph.D., and Youngmin Yi (January 2013)

Women in Buncombe County, as in North Carolina as a whole, have made much progress during the last few decades, yet more remains to be done to elevate women’s status. The majority of women work— many in professional and managerial jobs—and women are a mainstay of the economic health of their communities. Yet, there are some ways in which women’s status still lags behind men’s, and not all women are prospering equally. This briefing paper provides basic information about the status of women in Buncombe County, focusing on women’s earnings and workforce participation, level of education, poverty, access to child care, and health status. It also provides background demographic information about women in the county.

 

The Status of Women in Henderson and Transylvania Counties, North Carolina
by Cynthia Hess, Ph.D.,and Youngmin Yi (January 2013)

Women in Henderson and Transylvania counties, as in North Carolina as a whole, have made much progress during the last few decades. The majority of women work—many in professional and managerial jobs—and women are a mainstay of the economic health of their communities. Yet, in some ways women’s status still lags behind men’s, and not all women are prospering equally. This briefing paper provides basic information about the status of women in Henderson and Transylvania counties, focusing on women’s earnings and workforce participation, level of education, poverty, access to child care, and health status. It also provides basic demographic information about women in this area.

 

The Status of Women in Cleveland, McDowell, Polk, and Rutherford Counties, North Carolina
by Cynthia Hess, Ph.D., Rhiana Gunn-Wright, and Claudia Williams (January 2013)

Women in Cleveland, McDowell, Polk, and Rutherford counties, as in North Carolina as a whole, have made much progress during the last few decades. The majority of women in these counties combined are in the labor force—many in professional and managerial jobs—and women are a mainstay of the economic health of their communities. Yet, in some ways women’s status in these counties still lags behind men’s, and not all women are prospering equally. This briefing paper provides information about the status of women in Cleveland, McDowell, Polk, and Rutherford counties, focusing on women’s earnings and workforce participation, level of education, poverty, access to child care, and health status. It also provides basic demographic information about women in this area.

 

The Status of Women in Ashe, Avery, Mitchell, Watauga, and Yancey Counties, North Carolina
by Cynthia Hess, Ph.D., Rhiana Gunn-Wright, and Youngmin Yi (January 2013)

Women in the western counties of North Carolina, and the state as a whole, have made much progress during the last few decades. The majority of women in these counties work—many in professional and managerial jobs—and women are a mainstay of the economic health of their communities. Yet, there are ways in which women’s status still lags behind men’s, and not all women are prospering equally. This briefing paper provides basic information about the status of women in five western North Carolina counties—Ashe, Avery, Mitchell, Watauga, and Yancey—focusing on women’s earnings and workforce participation, level of education, poverty, access to child care, and health status. It also provides basic demographic information about women in the region.

 

The Status of Women in the Asheville Metropolitan Area, North Carolina
by Cynthia Hess, Ph.D., Youngmin Yi, and Alicia Sheares (January 2013)

This briefing paper provides basic information about the status of women in the Asheville area (which includes Buncombe and Madison counties), focusing on women’s earnings and workforce participation, level of education, poverty, access to child care, and health status. It also provides background demographic information about women in the region.

 

The Status of Women in the Triangle Metropolitan Area, North Carolina
by Ariane Hegewisch, Rhiana Gunn-Wright, and Claudia Williams (January 2013)

This briefing paper provides basic information about the status of women in the Triangle area, focusing on women’s earnings and workforce participation, level of education, poverty, access to child care, and health status. It also provides background demographic information about women in the region.

 

The Status of Women in the Greensboro Metropolitan Area, North Carolina
by Ariane Hegewisch, Rhiana Gunn-Wright, and Claudia Williams (January 2013)

Women in the Greensboro area, and in North Carolina as a whole, have made much progress during the last few decades. The majority of women work—many in professional jobs—and women are essential to the economic health of their communities. Yet, there are some ways in which women’s status still lags behind men’s, and not all women are prospering equally. This fact sheet provides basic information about the status of women in the Greensboro metropolitan area—including Alamance, Davidson, Davie, Forsyth, Guilford, Randolph, Stokes, and Yadkin counties—focusing on women’s earnings and workforce participation, level of education, poverty, access to child care, and health status. It also provides background demographic information about women in the region.

 

Access to Paid Sick Days in Portland, Oregon
by Isela Bañuelos and Claudia Williams (December 2012)

Access to paid sick days promotes healthy work environments by reducing the spread of illnesses, increasing productivity, and supporting work and family balance. Paid sick days allow employees to take time off work to recover from personal illnesses and tend to family members’ health without the fear of monetary or other negative consequences. Despite the importance of paid sick days, a large proportion of workers in the Portland, Oregon, area receive no paid sick time at all. This fact sheet presents paid sick days access rates by occupation, sex, race and ethnicity, and personal income in the Portland area. The Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR) derived these estimates through analysis of government data sources including the National Health Interview Survey and the American Community Survey.

 
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The Gender Wage Gap in New York State and Its Solutions
by Ariane Hegewish, Jeff Hayes, Heidi Hartmann, Jocelyn Fischer, Claudia Williams, Justine Augeri (December 2012)

 
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