Informing policy. Inspiring change. Improving lives.
1200 18th Street NW, Suite 301
Washington, DC 20036
202 785-5100
iwpr@iwpr.org

The Shriver Report: A Woman's Nation Pushes Back from the Brink

About The Shriver Report

In an era when women have solidified their position as half of the U.S. workforce and a whopping two-thirds of the primary or co-breadwinners in American families, the reality is that one in three American women is living at or near the brink of poverty. That’s 42 million women and the 28 million children who depend on them, living one single incident—a doctor’s bill, a late paycheck, or a broken-down car—away from economic ruin. Women make up nearly two-thirds of minimum-wage workers, and a vast majority of them receive no paid sick days. This is at a time when women earn most of the college and advanced degrees in this country, make most of the consumer spending decisions by far, and are more than half of the nation’s voters.

This week, Maria Shriver is launching The Shriver Report: A Woman’s Nation Pushes Back from the Brink, in partnership with the Center for American Progress. This is the third in a series of groundbreaking examinations of cultural transformations impacting American women and families. This Shriver Report is a multiplatform study of the profound change in the makeup and reality of American families and the failure of government, business, and other cultural institutions to adapt to this change and deal with it. The fact is that the average family is not what it used to be. Today, only one-fifth of our families have a male breadwinner and a female homemaker. And it’s not only that women are breadwinning in most families. These days, more than half of babies born to mothers under age 30 are born to single mothers, the majority of whom are white. This is a seismic shift, and it’s time for our institutions to catch up.

View the trailer for the report, "She's the One." Visit www.ShriverReport.org for more information, and to download a free copy of A Woman's Nation Pushes Back from the Brink (available for free until January 15, 2014).

IWPR Experts

For general media inquiries, please contact Jennifer Clark, IWPR Communications Manager, at clark@iwpr.org or 202-683-6855.

Experts

Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., President

Dr. Hartmann lectures internationally on women, economics, and public policy; frequently testifies before the U.S. Congress; and is often cited as an authority in various media outlets, such as The New York Times, NBC Nightly News, MSNBC, and The Wall Street Journal. She is a co-author of several IWPR reports, including Women’s and Men’s Employment and Unemployment in the Great Recession; Still A Man’s Labor Market: The Long-Term Earnings Gap; and Unnecessary Losses: Costs to Americans of the Lack of Family and Medical Leave; Equal Pay for Working Families. In 1994, Dr. Hartmann was the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship Award for her work in the field of women and economics.

Jeff Hayes, Ph.D., Study Director

Dr. Hayes works on projects examining women’s and men’s employment, job quality, and economic security over the life course using national survey data. He worked previously at the McGill Institute for Health and Social Policy and the Harvard Project on Global Working Families analyzing child and family well-being with a focus on how socioeconomic status and labor conditions affect children’s health and development around the world.

Ariane Hegewisch, Study Director

Ms. Hegewisch is responsible for IWPR’s research on workplace discrimination, the gender wage gap, and occupational segregation, and is a specialist in comparative human resource management, with a focus on policies and legislative approaches to facilitate greater work life reconciliation and gender equality, in the US and internationally. She is the co-author of “Separate and Note Equal? Gender Segregation in the Labor Market and the Gender Wage Gap” She is an expert on paid leave, comparative work/family policy, and workplace discrimination and has been featured in a variety of media outlets.

Latest Reports from IWPR

How Equal Pay for Working Women would Reduce Poverty and Grow the American Economy
by Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., Jeffrey Hayes, Ph.D., and Jennifer Clark (January 2014)

Persistent earnings inequality for working women translates into lower pay, less family income, and more poverty in families with a working woman, which is of no small consequence to working families. About 71 percent of all mothers in the United States work for pay. Of these, about two-thirds (68 percent) are married and typically have access to men’s incomes, but married women’s earnings are nevertheless crucial to family support. One-third (32 percent) are single mothers and often the sole support of their families. And many without children, both single and married, work to support themselves and other family members. This briefing paper summarizes analyses of the 2010-2012 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic supplement and uses statistical controls for labor supply, human capital, and labor market characteristics to estimate: 1) how much women’s earnings and family incomes would rise with equal pay; 2) how much women and their families lose because women earn less than similarly qualified men; and 3) how much the economy as a whole suffers from inequality in pay between women and men.

 

The Gender Wage Gap: 2012
by Ariane Hegewisch, Claudia Williams (September 2013)

The ratio of women’s and men’s median annual earnings was 76.5 percent for full-time/year-round workers in 2012. This means the gender wage gap for full-time/year-round workers is 23.5 percent. Women’s median annual earnings in 2012 were $37,791 compared with $49,398 for men. The gender wage gap has stayed essentially unchanged since 2001. In the previous decade, between 1991 and 2000, it closed by almost four percentage points, and in the decade prior to that, 1981 and 1990, by over ten percentage points (Table 2). If the pace of change in the annual earnings ratio continues at the same rate as it has since 1960, it will take another 45 years, until 2058, for men and women to reach parity.

 

The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation
by Ariane Hegewisch and Maxwell Matite (April 2013)

Women’s median earnings are lower than men’s in nearly all occupations, whether they work in occupations predominantly done by women, occupations predominantly done by men, or occupations with a more even mix of men and women. During 2012, median weekly earnings for female full-time workers were $691, compared with $854 per week for men, a gender wage ratio of 80.9 percent (Table 1; a gender wage gap of 19.1 percent).1 Added to the gender wage gap within occupations is the gender wage gap between occupations. Male-dominated occupations tend to pay more than female-dominated occupations at similar skill levels, particularly in jobs that require higher educational levels.2 Tackling occupational segregation is an important part of eliminating the gender wage gap.

 

Separate and Not Equal? Gender Segregation in the Labor Market and the Gender Wage Gap
by Ariane Hegewisch, Hannah Liepmann, Jeffrey Hayes, and Heidi Hartmann (August 2010)

Occupational gender segregation is a strong feature of the US labor market. While some occupations have become increasingly integrated over time, others remain highly dominated by either men or women. Our analysis of trends in overall gender segregation shows that, after a considerable move towards more integrated occupations in the 1970s and 1980s, progress has completely stalled since the mid 1990s. Occupational segregation is a concern to policy makers for two reasons: it is inefficient economically, preventing able people from moving into occupations where they could perform well and that would satisfy them more than the ones open to them. And occupational segregation is a major cause for the persistent wage gap. Our analysis confirms that average earnings tend to be lower the higher the percentage of female workers in an occupation, and that this relationship is strongest for the most highly skilled occupations, such as medicine or law. Yet this is also a strong feature of jobs requiring little formal education and experience, increasing the likelihood of very low earnings for women working in female-dominated, low-skilled occupations such as childcare.

#C377, 16 pages
$5.00
Quantity:
Document Actions
Go to Home Page