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February 2014 RNR

 

Research Making

the News

 

Higher Education has Long-term Benefits for Older Americans but Women Still Earn Less than Men, Study Shows

 

Advice for Young Women: Get a Union Job

 

Millennial Women Make Nearly as Much as Men, but Still Have Dim View of Equality

 

Many Blacks and Latinos Have No Retirement Savings, Study Shows

 

Study: U.S. Poverty Rate Decreased Over Past Half-Century Thanks to Safety-Net Programs

 

New Research Reports

 

Valuing Good Health in Newark: The Costs and Benefits of Earned Sick Time

 

Access to Earned Sick Days in Eugene, Oregon

 

Job Growth for Women and Men Continues; Unemployment Rates at Five-Year Lows

 

Employment Capital: How Work Builds and Protects Family Wealth and Security

 

EEOC Women's Work

Group Report

 

 

 

 

Quick Links

 

Recent Publications


IWPR Blog

 

Media and Events

 

Research  News Roundup

 

IWPR

 

 

 

 

New Year, new look! IWPR has relaunched its Research News Reporter as the Research News Roundup, still bringing research highlights on women and families to your inbox each month.

 

RESEARCH MAKING THE NEWS

Higher Education Has Long-term Benefits for
Older Americans but Women Still Earn Less
than Men, Study Shows

By Karen Farkas || 1.2.2014

 

"Higher education pays off for women and men age 50 and older, including those 75 and older, according to new research from the Institute for Women’s Policy Research."

 

Citing: How Education Pays Off for Older Americans, by Heidi Hartmann and Jeff Hayes, Institute for Women’s Policy Research

 

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Advice for Young Women: Get a Union Job

By Michelle Chen|The Huffington Post|12.24.2013

 

"‘Even after controlling for factors such as age, race, industry, educational attainment and state of residence, the data show a substantial boost in pay and benefits for female workers in unions relative to their non-union counterparts.'"

 

Citing: Women Workers and Unions, by John Schmitt and Nicole Woo, Center for Economic and Policy Research and Education

 

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Millennial Women Make Nearly as Much as Men, but Still Have Dim View of Equality

By Brenda Cronin||12.11.2013

 

“Young women just entering the work force have the narrowest pay gap with men they likely will have in their careers — but that hasn’t brightened their view of overall equality in the work place."

 

Citing: On Pay Gap, Millennial Women Near Parity – For Now, by Pew Research Center

 

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Many Blacks and Latinos Have No Retirement Savings, Study Shows

By Michael A. Fletcher||12.9.2013

 

"Americans of all races face the growing prospect of downward mobility in retirement, the report said, but the problem is particularly acute for blacks and Hispanics."

 

Citing: Race and Retirement Insecurity in the United States, by Nari Rhee, National Institute on Retirement Security

 

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Study: U.S. Poverty Rate Decreased Over Past Half-Century Thanks to Safety-Net Programs

By Zachary A. Goldfarb||12.9.2013

 

"According to the new research, the safety net helped reduce the percentage of Americans in poverty from 26 percent in 1967 to 16 percent in 2012."

 

Citing: Trends in Poverty with an Anchored Supplemental Poverty Measures by Christopher Wimer, Liana Fox, Irv Garkinkel, Neeraj Kaushal, and Jane Waldfogel Columbia Population Research Center

 

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NEW RESEARCH REPORTS

 

Valuing Good Health in Newark: The Costs and Benefits of Earned Sick Time

Claudia Williams, Susan Andrzejewski, and Jeff Hayes | Institute for Women's Policy Research |December 2013

 

This IWPR briefing paper uses data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the New Jersey Department of Health, and the U.S. Census Bureau to evaluate costs and benefits of Newark’s Worker Sick Leave Ordinance. It estimates how much time off Newark workers would use under the proposed policy and the costs to employers for that earned sick time. This analysis also uses findings from previous peer-reviewed research to estimate cost-savings associated with the proposed policy, through reduced turnover, reduced spread of contagious disease in the workplace, prevention of productivity losses from employees working while sick, minimized nursing-home stays, and reduced norovirus outbreaks in nursing homes. The study is one of a series of analyses by IWPR examining the effects of earned sick day policies.

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Access to Earned Sick Days in Eugene, Oregon

Claudia Williams |Institute for Women's Policy Research| December 2013

 

An analysis by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) reveals that about 25,310 or 51 percent of private sector employees in Eugene, Oregon lack even a single earned sick day off. Access to earned sick days promotes healthy work environments by reducing the spread of illness, increasing productivity, and supporting work and family balance. Earned sick days allow people to take time off work to recover from illness and to tend to family members’ health without the fear of lost pay or other negative consequences. This briefing paper presents estimates of lack of access to earned sick days in Eugene, Oregon, by sex, and personal annual earnings, and in Oregon by race and ethnicity through analysis of government data sources, including the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the American Community Survey (ACS).

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Job Growth for Women and Men Continues; Unemployment Rates at Five-Year Lows

Institute for Women's Policy Research| December 2013

 

According to an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the December employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), of the 203,000 total jobs added to nonfarm payrolls in November, women gained 94,000 of those jobs (46 percent) while men gained 109,000 jobs (54 percent). Due to continued job growth in November, women hold more jobs on payrolls than ever before (women initially surpassed their previous employment peak in October). Men have regained 75 percent (4.5 million) of the jobs they lost during the recession.

 

The November data is consistent with IWPR's analysis of trends that emerged in the first four years of the recovery, notably the relative growth in industries—such as Education and Health Services—with high concentrations of women workers.

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Employment Capital: How Work Builds and Protects Family Wealth and Security

Hannah Thomas, Janet Boguslaw, Sara Chaganti, Alicia Atkinson, and Thomas Shapiro |Institute on Assets and Social Policy|December 2013

 

The second report in the Leveraging Mobility series, “Employment Capital: How Work Builds and Protects Family Wealth and Security,” suggests the link between employment and building wealth goes far beyond the paycheck. Drawing on the lived experiences of families, this report adds a critical new understanding of the connection between work and wealth. Interviewing young families in the late 1990s—when the economy was growing and prosperous—and again in 2010—during a stagnant economy amid dramatic wealth loss—we were surprised to find that more than two-thirds had seen their wealth increase. As we talked to them, it became clear that many factors were at play. One important observation was that for many of the families that built wealth, the characteristics of their employment facilitated a pathway to accumulating wealth that income alone could not provide. A puzzle remained, however. African-American families in our interview sample saw their incomes and educations rise in relation to those of white families, and yet their wealth increased at a significantly lower rate. Sifting through the interview data and aligning it with national data as a comparison, it became clear that wealth-building job characteristics are distributed unequally, and sorted through race, class, and occupation.

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EEOC Women's Work Group Report

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) |

December 12, 2013

 

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) issued a comprehensive report addressing major obstacles hindering equal opportunities for women in the federal workforce, in addition to highlighting stakeholder recommendations.  The report, prepared by an internal agency work group, is based upon in-depth research and widespread consultations with key stakeholder groups representing working women, as well as other affinity organizations. Following are the six obstacles identified in the EEOC Women's Work Group Report: (1) Inflexible workplace policies create challenges for women with caregiver obligations in the federal workforce (2) Higher-level and management positions remain harder to obtain for women (3) Women are underrepresented in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields in the federal workforce (4) Women and men do not earn the same average salary in the federal government (5) Unconscious gender biases and stereotypical perceptions about women still play an important role in employment decisions in the federal sector (6) There is a perception that federal agencies lack commitment to achieving equal opportunities for women in the federal workplace.

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