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Recent Publications

Latest Reports from IWPR

Women’s Median Earnings as a Percent of Men’s Median Earnings, 1960-2015 (Full-time, Year-round Workers) with Projection for Pay Equity in 2059
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (September 2016)

 

Native American Women Saw the Largest Declines in Wages over the Last Decade among All Women
by Asha DuMonthier (September 2016)

Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of data from the American Community Survey finds that between 2004 and 2014, Native American women’s real median annual earnings for full-time, year-round work declined by 5.8 percent—more than three times as much as women’s earnings overall (Figure 1). Like Native American women, Black women and Hispanic women also saw their earnings fall substantially between 2004 and 2014, which includes the Great Recession and slow economic recovery (5.0 percent and 4.5 percent, respectively).

 

Breadwinner Mothers by Race/Ethnicity and State
by Julie Anderson (September 2016)

With the large majority of U.S. mothers in the labor force and a steady decline in the real earnings of all workers over recent decades, families are increasingly relying on mothers’ earnings for economic stability. In the United States, half of all households with children under 18 have a breadwinner mother, who is either a single mother who heads a household, irrespective of earnings, or a married mother who provides at least 40 percent of the couple’s joint earnings. At the same time, women are more likely than men to shoulder unpaid caregiving responsibilities and many women, especially women of color, are more likely to be balancing work and care alone. The lack of work-family supports in the United States, such as paid sick days and paid family leave, coupled with the high cost of child care, places an additional burden on low-income women and women of color, who are the least likely to have employer-provided paid leave.

 

Child Care for Parents in College: A State-by-State Assessment
by Ellie Eckerson, Lauren Talbourdet, Lindsey Reichlin, Mary Sykes, Elizabeth Noll Ph.D., and Barbara Gault, Ph.D. (September 2016)

Child care is a crucial support for the 4.8 million parents in college, but it is difficult for students to find and afford. Balancing the responsibilities of school, family, and work, student parents with young children rely on affordable, reliable child care arrangements to manage the many demands on their time while pursuing a postsecondary credential. Student parents’ ability to find and pay for child care varies by state. Differences in the availability of child care on college campuses and in the restrictiveness of state eligibility rules for child care assistance means that many student parents have limited access to the services they need to complete school. This briefing paper analyzes data from the U.S. Department of Education on the share of public institutions that provide campus child care, and reviews current state child care subsidy rules, to assess state variation in the challenges facing student parents’ access to affordable, quality child care.

 

Black Women Are Among Those Who Saw the Largest Declines in Wages over the Last Decade
by Asha DuMonthier (August 2016)

Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of data from the American Community Survey finds that between 2004 and 2014, Black women’s real median annual earnings for full-time, year-round work declined by 5.0 percent—more than three times as much as women’s earnings overall. Like Black women, Native American women and Hispanic women also saw their earnings fall substantially between 2004 and 2014, which includes the Great Recession and slow economic recovery (5.8 percent and 4.5 percent, respectively).

 

Strong Job Gains Continue with 255,000 Jobs Added in July
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (August 2016)

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the August employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) finds that women gained 181,000 jobs and men gained 74,000 for a total of 255,000 jobs added in July, giving women 71 percent of job growth.

 

Student Parents’ Access to Campus Child Care Continued to Decline in 2015
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (July 2016)

The 4.8 million parents enrolled in college perform a complicated balancing act.1 According to new IWPR analysis, availability of campus child care continued to decline in 2015, with just under half of public four-year institutions providing campus child care services, down from a high of 55 percent in 2003-05 (Figure 1). At community colleges, where the largest share of parents are enrolled, only 44 percent report having an on-campus center, down from over half (53 percent) in 2003-04 (Figure 1).2 Given the importance of higher education to a family’s economic security and their children’s future success, ensuring that student parents have access to affordable, quality care must be a priority for educational institutions, higher education advocates, and policymakers.

 

The Gender Patenting Gap
by Jessica Milli, Barbara Gault, Emma Williams-Baron, Jenny Xia, and Meika Berlan (July 2016)

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research reviewed and analyzed published data and literature on women and patenting, finding that women hold an extremely small share of patents, and that at the current rate of progress, gender equity is more than 75 years away. This briefing paper presents a snapshot of the data and related recommendations.

 
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