Informing policy. Inspiring change. Improving lives.
1200 18th Street NW, Suite 301
Washington, DC 20036
202 785-5100
iwpr@iwpr.org

Recent Publications

Latest Reports from IWPR

Women and Men Share Stronger Job Gains in December—Women’s Unemployment Rate Is at 4.8 Percent; Men’s at 5.2 Percent
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (January 2016)

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the January employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) finds that women gained 141,000 jobs and men gained 151,000 for a total of 292,000 jobs added in December. Revisions to preliminary estimates of nonfarm payroll employment for October and November improved the picture for men adding 121,000 jobs to previous releases. Those revisions reduced the number of jobs added for women by 12,000 in October and November. The overall unemployment rate remained steady at 5.0 percent in November and December.

 

Brief of Institute for Women’s Policy Research, National Association of Social Workers, Texas Chapter of National Association of Social Workers, and Re:Gender as Amici Curiae In Support of Petitioners (Whole Woman’s Health v. Cole)
by Institute for Women's Policy Research, National Association of Social Workers, Texas Chapter of National Association of Social Workers, and Re:Gender (January 2016)

Amici the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, the National Association of Social Workers, the Texas Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers, and Re:Gender (formerly the National Council for Research on Women) are organizations committed to improving the health and well-being of women and their families nationally and in the state of Texas. They have submitted an amicus brief in support of the petitioners in Whole Woman’s Health v. Cole that sets forth the particularly poor health and well-being outcomes facing women and their families in the state of Texas, including higher cancer incidence and mortality rates, lower life expectancy, and lack of access to affordable health and prenatal care. The brief explains how these poor health outcomes in part reflect policy choices of the Texas legislature. It concludes by arguing that, although Texas has justified H.B. 2 as legislation intended to improve the health of women in the state, Texas’s track record suggests otherwise, and the Supreme Court should thus take into account Texas’s failure to implement various health promotion policies as it assesses whether the stated purpose behind H.B. 2 withstands constitutional scrutiny.

 
Document Actions
Go to Home Page