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Recent Publications

Latest Reports from IWPR

Securing a Better Future: A Portrait of Female Students in Mississippi’s Community Colleges
by Cynthia Hess, Ph.D., Sylvia Krohn, Lindsey Reichlin, Stephanie Román, and Barbara Gault, Ph.D. (June 2014)

This report presents findings from a survey of female community college students in Mississippi conducted by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) and commissioned by the Women’s Foundation of Mississippi. The survey is designed to identify supports and practices that can help women succeed in community college and attain economic security. It explores women’s motivations for pursuing college, their personal and career goals, their support needs, and the economic, health, and time challenges that they experience. The survey was designed as a part of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research’s Student Parent Success Initiative, which provides information and tools to promote the success of student parents in postsecondary education.

 

Men Still 699,000 Jobs Short of Employment Recovery; Strong Job Gains in May for Men and Women in Female-Dominated Industries
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (June 2014)

According to an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the June employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), although the total number of jobs lost in the recession has been recovered (138,463,000 jobs in May 2014 vs. 138,350,000 jobs in December 2007, when the recession began), men are still short 699,000 from their prerecession peak. Women regained their peak in August 2013. In May, women gained 86,000 jobs on nonfarm payrolls, while men gained 131,000 for an increase of 217,000 total jobs in May. In the past year, men have gained more than half the new jobs added (53 percent vs. 47 percent for women).

 

Appendix E, Building Women’s Political Careers: Strengthening the Pipeline to Higher Office
by Denise L. Baer (May 2014)

These protocols were used in a project conducted by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research for the Hunt Alternatives Fund, for which Denise Baer served as consulting project director. This appendix represents pages E1-32 of the final report of study results: Building Women’s Political Careers: Strengthening the Pipeline to Higher Office, written by Denise L. Baer and Heidi I. Hartmann.

 

Building Women’s Political Careers: Strengthening the Pipeline to Higher Office
by Denise L. Baer, Heidi I. Hartmann (May 2014)

This report was prepared by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) for Political Parity, a program of the Hunt Alternatives Fund. The report analyzes results from interviews with experienced candidates and officeholders and several focus groups with elected state legislators, young elected officials, and congressional staff members to investigate how women make the decision to run and how they develop their political careers, with a focus on seeking or achieving higher office. The report is a part of IWPR's larger body of work on examining women’s roles in civic and political leadership.Political Parity, a nonpartisan program of Hunt Alternatives Fund, supports research that tests innovative ideas and defines effective strategies to elect more women in these roles. Political Parity published a separate report and executive summary combining results from this qualitative study, the Achieving Parity Study (APS), and an original quantitative survey of state legislators, The Female State Legislators Survey (FSLS), conducted by Lake Research Partners and Chesapeake Beach Consulting. Both studies examine the motivators and obstacles female candidates and elected officials consider when deciding whether or not to run for higher office. All Political Parity publications are available at www.politicalparity.org.

 

Women Gained 166,000 Jobs in April; Men Gained 51 Percent of Jobs Added in the Past Year
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (May 2014)

According to an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the May employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), women gained 166,000 jobs on nonfarm payrolls in April, while men gained 122,000 for an increase of 288,000 total jobs in April. Women’s employment growth was strongest in Professional and Business Services (42,000 jobs gained by women), Education and Health Services (33,000 jobs gained by women), Leisure and Hospitality (27,000 jobs gained by women), Retail Trade (24,000 jobs gained by women, and Government (13,000 jobs gained by women).

 

The Well-Being of Women in Utah: An Overview
by Cynthia Hess, Ph.D. and Claudia Williams (May 2014)

This briefing paper provides an overview of how women in Utah fare in key dimensions of their lives: earnings, education, and economic security; physical and emotional health and safety; and political leadership and participation. While it lies beyond the scope of the paper to address other key aspects of women’s overall well-being—such as faith and spirituality, family and friendships, civic and community involvement, and sports and fitness—the data provided here identify important areas of progress and challenges for Utah women and suggest policy directions that would benefit the state as a whole.

 

College Affordability for Low-Income Adults: Improving Returns on Investment for Families and Society
by Barbara Gault, Ph.D., Lindsey Reichlin, M.A., Stephanie Román (April 2014)

This report was prepared by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) as a part of a series of papers on defining college affordability sponsored by the Lumina Foundation. The report examines how efforts to understand and improve college affordability can be informed by the experiences and circumstances of low-income adults, students of color, and students with dependent children.

 

The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation and by Race and Ethnicity, 2013
by Ariane Hegewisch and Stephanie Keller Hudiburg (April 2014)

Women’s median earnings are lower than men’s in nearly all occupations, whether they work in occupations predominantly done by women, occupations predominantly done by men, or occupations with a more even mix of men and women. Data for both women’s and men’s median weekly earnings for full-time work are available for 112 occupations ; there are only three occupations in which women have higher median weekly earnings than men. In 101 of the 112 occupations, the gender earnings ratio of women’s median weekly earnings to men’s is 0.95 or lower (that is, a wage gap of at least 5 cents per dollar earned by men); in 17 of these occupations the gender earnings ratio is lower than 0.75 (that is, a wage gap of more than 25 cents per dollar earned by men).

 

Women Gained 99,000 Jobs in March
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (April 2014)

According to an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the April employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), women gained 99,000 jobs on nonfarm payrolls in March, while men gained 93,000 for an increase of 192,000 jobs in March. In March, women’s employment growth was strongest in Professional and Business Services (29,000 jobs gained by women), Retail Trade (26,000 jobs gained by women), Education and Health Services (24,000 jobs gained by women), and Leisure and Hospitality (15,000 jobs gained by women).

 

The Gender Wage Gap: 2013; Differences by Race and Ethnicity, No Growth in Real Wages for Women
by Ariane Hegewisch, Claudia Williams, Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., and Stephanie Keller Hudiburg (March 2014)

The gender wage gap in the United States has not seen significant improvement in recent years, and remains a reality for women across racial and ethnic groups. In 2013, the ratio of women’s to men’s median weekly full-time earnings was 82.1 percent, an increase of more than one percentage point since 2012,when the ratio was 80.9 percent (but still slightly lower than the 2011 ratio of 82.2 percent). This corresponds to a weekly gender wage gap of 17.9 percent. Real earnings have remained largely unchanged since 2012; women’s median weekly earnings increased by $5 to $706 in 2013; men’s median weekly earnings increased to $860, a marginal increase of $7 compared with 2012.

 

Women Gained 99,000 Jobs in February
by Institute for Women's Policy Research (March 2014)

According to an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the March employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), women gained 99,000 jobs on nonfarm payrolls in February, while men gained 76,000 for a net increase of 175,000 jobs in February. In February, women’s employment growth was strongest in Professional and Business Services (55,000 jobs gained by women), Education and Health Services (24,000 jobs gained by women), Leisure and Hospitality (14,000 jobs gained by women), Financial Activities (12,000 jobs gained by women), and Government (11,000 jobs gained by women). Women lost 16,000 jobs in Trade, Transportation, and Utilities including 10,000 jobs in Retail Trade alone.

 

Valuing Good Health in Illinois: The Costs and Benefits of Earned Sick Time
by Claudia Williams (March 2014)

This briefing paper uses data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the U.S. Census Bureau to evaluate costs and benefits of Illinois’ Earned Sick Time Act. It estimates how much time off Illinois workers would use under the proposed policy and the costs to employers for that earned sick time. This analysis also uses findings from previous peer-reviewed research to estimate cost-savings associated with the proposed policy, through reduced turnover, reduced spread of contagious disease in the workplace, increased productivity; minimized nursing-home stays, and reduced norovirus outbreaks in nursing homes. The study is one of a series of analyses by IWPR examining the effects of earned sick time policies.

 

Paid Sick Days in Chicago Would Lower Health Care Costs by Reducing Unnecessary Emergency Department Visits
by Claudia Williams (March 2014)

In Chicago, 42 percent of the private workforce, or approximately 461,000 employees, lack access to paid sick days. This fact sheet reports findings from research by the Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR) on how increased access to paid sick days would improve both accesses to health care and health outcomes in the City of Chicago. The research also quantifies the savings gained by providing access to paid sick days to all workers, by preventing unnecessary emergency department visits in Chicago.

 

Valuing Good Health in Chicago: The Costs and Benefits of Earned Sick Time
by Claudia Williams (March 2014)

This briefing paper uses data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the U.S. Census Bureau to evaluate costs and benefits of Chicago’s Earned Sick Time Ordinance. It estimates how much time off Chicago workers would use under the proposed policy and the costs to employers for that earned sick time. This analysis also uses findings from previous peer-reviewed research to estimate cost-savings associated with the proposed policy, through reduced turnover, reduced spread of contagious disease in the workplace, prevention of productivity losses from employees working while sick, minimized nursing-home stays, and reduced norovirus outbreaks in nursing homes. The study is one of a series of analyses by IWPR examining the effects of earned sick time policies.

 

Paid Sick Days Access in the United States: Differences by Race/Ethnicity, Occupation, Earnings, and Work Schedule
by Claudia Williams and Barbara Gault (March 2014)

Paid sick days bring substantial benefits to employers, workers, families, and communities. The economic and public health benefits of paid sick leave coverage include safer work environments; improved work life balance, reduced spread of contagion; and reduced health care costs. Access to this important benefit, however, is still too rare, and is unequally distributed across the U.S. population, with differences by race and ethnicity, occupation, earnings levels, and work schedules. Utilizing data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), IWPR finds that in 2012, approximately 61 percent of private-sector workers age 18 and older in the U.S. had access to paid sick days (Figure 1); up from 57 percent in 2009. More than 41 million workers lack access.

 
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