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MEDIA & EVENTS

IWPR is often cited in the media as a source for current and reliable research on women.  View IWPR’s latest press releases and press clips below.

For Media Inquiries, please contact Jennifer Clark at 202-683-6855 or by e-mail clark@iwpr.org.

To view IWPR's multimedia page, click here.

New Survey Finds Construction Trades Offer Good Wages for Women Workers, but Harassment and Discrimination Still Common
A new brief from the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) summarizes findings from the 2013 IWPR Tradeswomen Survey and finds that many women working in the construction trades earn good wages, but discrimination and harassment are far too common experiences.
Nearly 3 in 4 Accommodation and Food Service Workers in Orange County, Florida, Lack Access to Paid Sick Days
Hispanic and Food Service Workers among the Least Likely to Have Paid Sick Days in San Jose
A new analysis by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) finds that 35 percent of San Jose’s private sector employees lack access to a single paid sick day. More than half (52 percent) of Hispanic workers in San Jose lack access to this important benefit.
With Much-Needed Job Growth in July, Men Have Recovered 94% of Jobs They Lost in Recession
According to an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the August employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), men gained nearly two out of every three jobs added to the U.S. economy last month. In July, women gained 68,000 jobs, while men gained 141,000 for an increase of 209,000 total jobs in July. Although the total number of jobs lost in the recession has been recovered, men are still short 392,000 jobs from their prerecession peak, having recovered 94 percent of jobs they lost. In addition, BLS revisions increased the number of jobs gained by men in May and June by 70,000, but decreased the number of jobs gained for women by 50,000.
Low Wage, Hispanic, and Immigrant Workers among the Least Likely to Have Paid Sick Days
New analysis by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) finds that access to paid sick days is unequally distributed across the U.S. population, with substantial differences by race and ethnicity, occupation, earnings levels, and work schedules. The study, using new data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), also reveals differences by sexual orientation, especially for men. IWPR found that only 56 percent of private sector workers had access to paid sick days, compared with 84 percent of public sector workers.
Tallying Female Workers Isn't Enough to Make Tech More Diverse (August 11, 2014)
The Atlantic
Why Are There So Many Women in Public Relations? (August 8, 2014)
The Atlantic
Five myths about the gender pay gap (July 25, 2014)
The Washington Post
Sick? Now you can stay home. (July 28, 2014)
The Washington Post
Corporate America's Staggering Sexism, In 1 Chart (July 22, 2014)
Huffington Post

Press Contacts

Jennifer Clark
Communications Manager
clark@iwpr.org
Phone: 202-683-6855
Mallory Mpare
Communications Associate
mpare@iwpr.org
Phone: 202-785-0186
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