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The Status of Women and Girls

About the Status of Women and Girls

IWPR’s “Status of Women” reports are a unique source of comprehensive information on women. IWPR has analyzed data on a wide range of indicators at the local, state, national, and international levels, including demographics, economic security, educational attainment, reproductive rights, political participation, civic engagement, and access to health care and work supports. To date, IWPR has released reports on each U.S. state and the District of Columbia, in addition to several city/area reports, and a series of reports and a toolkit on Women in the Middle East and North Africa. Each report offers policy recommendations shaped by the research findings for that state or city/area. Recent state-level reports include The Status of Women & Girls in Colorado, The Status of Women in North Carolina, The Status of Women & Girls in West Virginia, and the 2010 Portrait of Women & Girls in the Washington Metropolitan Area.

 

Resources

2012 Status of Women Data
State and Local Reports

The Status of Women in Your County: A Community Research Tool

Status of Women in the States
Status of Women in the Middle East and North Africa

Visit our external resources page for links to more information on this topic.

To see our experts on this and other initiatives, click here.

Latest Reports from IWPR

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Focus on Morocco Topic Brief: Project Overview and Respondent Demographics (French Translation)
by IWPR (January 2010)

 

Focus on Yemen: Opinions on Early Marriage and Gender Quotas
by IWPR & IFES (January 2010)

 

Black Girls in New York City: Untold Strength and Resilience
by Avis Jones-DeWeever, Ph.D. (February 2009)

Black Girls in New York City: Untold Strength and Resilience provides an often unseen portrait of the lives of Black girls living in the city of New York. The report offers an overview of literature as well as an analysis of original data collected through focus groups and written surveys. The findings uncover some of the specific challenges and daily struggles faced by girls of African descent, while also identifying their strengths, triumphs, and modes of survival. Ultimately, the report lays out a plan for how those issues, particular to the experiences of Black girls, can best be addressed through the concerted efforts of family, community, and policymakers, and through the self-determining work of these girls themselves.

 

The Economic Status of Women in New York State
by Erica Williams (May 2008)

The Economic Status of Women in New York State is essential reading for all of us who care about New York’s women. Using current government data, the Institute for Women’s Policy Research gives policymakers, advocates, scholars, and others a clear and comprehensive picture of the economic status of women in New York.

 

Women in the Wake of the Storm: Examining the Post-Katrina Realities of the Women of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast (Executive Summary)
by Avis Jones-DeWeever, Ph.D. (April 2008)

 

Women in the Wake of the Storm: Examining the Post-Katrina Realities of the Women of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast
by Avis Jones-DeWeever, Ph.D. (April 2008)

This report puts to paper the perspectives of women gathered through a series of semi-structured one-on-one and small group interviews with thirty-eight women in New Orleans and Slidell, Louisiana as well as in Biloxi and Gulfport, Mississippi. The women included in this study ranged in age from 19 to 66 and are of diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds, including Black, White, Creole, and Latina. Each woman contributed to their communities as volunteers, activists, community organizers, or professionals engaged in public service careers. Many, but not all, were involved with organizations that focused specifically on issues of concern to women. Each sought, in some way, not just to meet immediate needs in the communities where they work, but also to address the long-standing pre-Katrina structures of advantage and disadvantage that ultimately exacerbated the tragedy of the storm’s aftermath.

#D481, Report, 36 pages
$10.00
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Status of Girls in Minnesota
by Erica Williams, Casey Clevenger, Lynette Osborne (March 2008)

The Status of Girls in Minnesota represents a collaborative effort by the Women’s Foundation of Minnesota and the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) to provide detailed information on the status of girls in Minnesota.

 

Status of Girls in Minnesota (Research Overview)
by Erica Williams, Casey Clevenger, Lynette Osborne (March 2008)

The Status of Girls in Minnesota draws on data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the Minnesota Student Survey Interagency Team, the Minnesota Department of Health, the Minnesota Department of Education, and other sources to examine the economic, social, physical, and psychological well-being of girls in the state. Each section of the research overview introduces key issues and data related to girls in Minnesota, as well as a set of recommendations for policy change, program improvement, and advocacy efforts to improve the status of Minnesota’s girls.

 

The Economic Status of Women in Georgia: Wide Disparities by Race and Ethnicity
by (December 2007)

Georgia reflects both the advances and limited progress achieved by women in the United States. Women in Georgia are seeing important changes in their lives and in their access to political, economic, and social rights. They by no means enjoy equality with men, however, and they still lack many of the legal guarantees that would allow them to achieve that equality. Women in Georgia would benefit from stronger enforcement of equal opportunity laws, greater availability of quality child care, improved access to health care, and other policies that would support their economic progress.

 

The Economic Status of Women in South Carolina: Wide Disparities by Race and Ethnicity
by Erica Williams (December 2007)

This paper examines how women in South Carolina fare on eight indicators of women’s economic status, in comparison with women in other states, including in South Carolina’s region, and with women nationally. It highlights where South Carolina women have seen economic progress and where their conditions have stagnated and examines differences among South Carolina’s women by race and ethnicity. It also details a number of recommendations for policy and practice to improve women’s lives and to promote a more productive state economy.

#R340, Briefing Paper, 24 pages
$5.00
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The Economic Status of Women in Indiana: Highlights
by Amy Caiazza, PhD and April Shaw (November 2007)

Indiana reflects both the advances and limited progress achieved by women in the United States. Women in Indiana and the United States as a whole are seeing important changes in their lives and in their access to political, economic, and social rights. They by no means enjoy equality with men, however, and they still lack many of the legal guarantees that would allow them to achieve that equality. Women in Indiana and the nation would benefit from stronger enforcement of equal opportunity laws, adequate and affordable child care, improved access to health care, and other policies that would bolster their economic progress.

 

The Economic Status of Women in Michigan
by Erica Williams (August 2007)

This paper examines how women in Michigan fare on eight indicators of women’s economic status, in comparison with women in other states, including in Michigan’s region, and with women nationally. It highlights where Michigan women have seen economic progress and where their conditions have stagnated and examines differences among Michigan’s women by race and ethnicity. It also details a number of recommendations for policy and practice to improve women’s lives and to promote a more productive state economy.

 

The Economic Status of Women in Ohio: Wide Disparities by Race and Ethnicity
by (January 2007)

This paper examines how women in Ohio fare on eight indicators of women’s economic status, in comparison with women in other states, including in Ohio’s region, and with women nationally. It highlights where Ohio women have seen economic progress and where their conditions have stagnated and examines differences among Ohio’s women by race and ethnicity. It also details a number of recommendations for policy and practice to improve women’s lives and to promote a more productive state economy.

#R335, Briefing Paper, 22 pages
$5.00
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The Best and Worst State Economies for Women
by Heidi Hartmann, PhD, Olga Sorokina, and Erica Williams (November 2006)

(Produced with the assistance of Vicky Lovell, PhD, Tori Finkle, Ashley English, and Amy Caiazza.) Women have made dramatic economic progress throughout the United States, especially since the 1960s. Yet, women have fared much better in some states than in others, and in no state do women fare as well economically as men. On several indicators,women have experienced important gains in the nearly two decades that the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) has been tracking these data. For example, women are more likely than men to be employed in managerial or professional jobs and to have health insurance coverage. At the same time, women still earn less, are less likely to have a Bachelor’s or professional degree, or to own a business,and are more likely to live in poverty than men across the states. With median annual earnings of $31,800, women employed full-time, year-round in the United States still earn only 77.0 percent of what men earn. Of all civilian women aged 16 and older,only 59.2 percent are in the labor force, compared with 71.8 percent of men.

#R334, 28 pages
$10.00
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The Best and Worst State Economies for Women
by (November 2006)

Women have made dramatic economic progress throughout the United States, especially since the 1960s. Yet, women have fared much better in some states than in others, and in no state do women fare as well economically as men. On several indicators, women have experienced important gains in the nearly two decades that the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) has been tracking these data. For example, women are more likely than men to be employed in managerial or professional jobs and to have health insurance coverage. At the same time, women still earn less, are less likely to have a Bachelor’s or professional degree, or to own a business, and are more likely to live in poverty than men across the states. With median annual earnings of $31,800, women employed full-time, year-round in the United States still earn only 77.0 percent of what men earn. Of all civilian women aged 16 and older, only 59.2 percent are in the labor force, compared with 71.8 percent of men.

#R334, Briefing Paper, 28 pages
$5.00
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The Women of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast: Multiple Disadvantages and Key Assets for Recovery Part II. Gender, Race, and Class in the Labor Market
by Erica Williams, Olga Sorokina, Avis Jones-DeWeever, Ph.D., and Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D. (July 2006)

This Briefing Paper is the second in a two-part series addressing the multiple disadvantages experienced by women, particularly women of color, in the areas hit by Katrina and Rita and in the areas in which many are now living. In Part 1, we discussed poverty among women and people of color in the Gulf Coast region and in the South more generally. In Part 2 we present data from before and after the storms, examine women’s role in the labor market in some detail prior to the hurricanes, and offer policy recommendations for reincorporating women into the workforce during and after the rebuilding period.

#D465, Briefing Paper, 32 pages
$5.00
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Report to the Maryland Equal Pay Commission
by Vicky Lovell, PhD, and Olga V. Sorokina (July 2006)

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research constructed a dataset from the 2002 through 2004 American Community Survey Public Use Microdata Files (ACS) for people residing in the state of Maryland.1 The dataset includes 25,172 wage and salary workers aged 16 to 64. Five mutually exclusive racial/ethnic categories were constructed from detailed self-reported identities: Non- Hispanic White, Non-Hispanic African American, Non-Hispanic Asian American, Hispanic, and All Other. Individuals in the “All Other” category are excluded from the analysis where race and ethnicity are disaggregated, as this group is too small for separate statistical analysis. (See Appendix I for more information about the dataset and analysis.)

Report, 33 pages
$10.00
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The Economic Status of Women in Arizona
by Erica Williams and Olga Sorokina (December 2005)

Women have made tremendous gains toward economic equality during the last several decades. Nonetheless, women throughout the United States still earn less, are less likely to own a business, and are more likely to live in poverty than men. Even in areas where there have been significant advances in women’s status, there is still ample room for improvement. For example, at the rate of progress achieved between 1995 and 2005, women will not achieve wage parity for nearly 50 years.

 

The Women of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast: Multiple Disadvantages and Key Assets for Recovery Part I. Poverty, Race, Gender and Class
by Gault, Barbara (September 2005)

by Barbara Gault, Ph.D., Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., Avis Jones-DeWeever, Ph.D., Misha Werschkul, and Erica Williams. This Briefing Paper, the first in a two-part series addressing the needs of the women of the Gulf Coast region, uncovers the multiple disadvantages experienced by women who lived in the areas affected by both the hurricanes, Katrina and Rita, and in many of the communities to which the evacuees are moving. It also outlines policy alternatives to help rebuild their lives in a way that will allow them to ultimately leave poverty behind.

#D464, Briefing Paper, 12 pages
$5.00
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Status of Women of Color in Minnesota
by Amy Caiazza, Ph.D., Jane Ransom, April Shaw (August 2005)

The Status of Women of Color in Minnesota provides the first focused look at key data from the United States Census on women of color in the state. It is presented as a stimulus and a tool for leaders and communities. Creative, integrated, community-wide solutions are urgently needed in order to unlock the economic, social, and political potential of Minnesota’s women of color and the families to whom they are essential. The more this important segment of its population thrives, the more Minnesota will thrive.

 
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