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Release Event: Organizations Working with Latina Immigrants: Resources and Strategies for Change

March 25, 2011
When Mar 25, 2011
from 09:30 AM to 01:30 PM
Where Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
Contact Name
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Organizations Working with Latina Immigrants: Resources and Strategies for Change will present findings from a two-year research project that explores how nonprofit organizations and religious congregations seek to advance the rights and well-being of Latina immigrants in Atlanta, Phoenix, and Northern Virginia. Featuring presentations from researchers and organizational leaders working closely with immigrants--especially women--the event will examine the specific challenges immigrant women face and the innovative strategies that organizations use to address them.

Agenda

1:30 p.m. Opening Remarks

Sonya Michel, Director of United States Studies, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

Heidi Hartmann, President, Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR)

Delia Pompa, Senior Vice President, Programs, National Council of La Raza (NCLR)

1:45 p.m. Keynote Introduction

Keynote speaker, Sara Manzano-Díaz, Director of the Women's Bureau,
United States Department of Labor

2:10 p.m. Report Presenters

Cynthia Hess and Jane Henrici, Study Directors, IWPR

2:40-3 p.m. Q&A Discussion

3-3:10 p.m. Break

3:10-5:20 p.m. Panel Sessions on Programs and  Policies
Affecting Latina Immigrants

Moderator: Patricia Foxen, Associate Director of Research, NCLR

    5:20-5:30 p.m. Closing remarks

    Barbara Gault, Executive Director and Vice President, IWPR

    About the sponsors:

    The Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR) was founded in 1987 as an independent, nonprofit research organization dedicated to informing and stimulating the debate on public policy issues of critical importance to women and their families. Since its inception, the Institute has applied gender analysis to social problems, highlighting effective solutions to poverty and inequality that address racial and ethnic differences. IWPR is tightly networked with grassroots and national coalitions and is a source for local, state, and national data analysis and technical assistance. IWPR is a highly credible and trusted resource for advocates, policymakers, and thought leaders. Its work is continually referenced in local, national, and international news media including print, radio, television, and online.

    National Council of la Raza (NCLR), the largest national Latino civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States, and works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. Through its network of nearly 300 affiliated community-based organizations, NCLR reaches millions of Latinos each year in 41 states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia. To achieve its mission, NCLR conducts applied research, policy analysis, and advocacy, providing a Latino perspective in key areas such as civil rights/immigration, education, health, employment and economic status, and children and youth.  In addition, it provides capacity-building assistance to its affiliates who work at the state and local level to advance opportunities for individuals and families.

    The Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars is a non-partisan research institute which aims to unite the world of ideas with the world of policy by supporting pre-eminent scholarship and linking it to issues of concern to policymakers in Washington and worldwide. Congress established the Center in 1968 as the official, national memorial to President Wilson. The United States Studies program, which dates back to the founding of the Center, stimulates research and reflection on problems in U.S. society, politics, and culture by placing contemporary policy issues in historical, comparative and global perspective. It seeks to understand the role of the United States as an important node in the transnational circulation of people, goods, and ideas.

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