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Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of January 26, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Rachel Linn

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing. 


 

January 27, 2016

PBS NewsHour: The only girl in school to spark an interest in welding

“The bigger picture is, why aren’t there more women going into welding or why aren’t there more women going into manufacturing,” said Rude. “From day one, women are fed the story of pink and princess,” she added. “It’s definitely a false representation of individuality.”

Watch more stories of students challenging gender stereotypes, part of our series called Outside the Box.

January 27, 2016

Lowell Sun (MA): Task force tackling underemployment

At a meeting of the governor’s Task Force on Persons Facing Chronically Higher Rates of Unemployment on Monday, Baker announced that his administration would invest $5 million of his fiscal 2017 budget into targeting chronically high unemployment. The breakdown of those funds will include $2 million to create an Economic Opportunity Fund, for investing in community-based organizations who partner with businesses to offer job training and hiring opportunities for people who face employment barriers…

Gregg Croteau, UTEC’s executive director, who was appointed to the task force when it was formed last March, told The Sun on Tuesday that his organization is “really optimistic” that Baker’s budget will include funding for helping people re-entering society after incarceration. “This Economic Opportunity Fund is really well-crafted in the sense that it also recognizes there’s a need for the supportive services as well,” Croteau said, including child care, transportation and help with substance-abuse issues.

January 26, 2016

Education Week (blog): Workforce Training Programs Should Consider Equity, Acting Ed. Secretary Says

States, communities, school districts, non-profits, and the federal government need to make sure equity is the watchword for implementation of the Workforce Investment and Opportunity Act. That was the message John B. King Jr., the acting U.S. Secretary of Education, delivered Tuesday to the Workforce Opportunity and Investment Act national convening, a conference of 700 state leaders and other organizations working to implement the new law.

King is hoping that job training facilities, community colleges, and adult-education providers will think about the needs of English-language learners, minority students, low-income students, students with disabilities parents, and other “nontraditional” students as they implement WIOA, which generally governors job training programs.

He urged job training programs, post-secondary institutions, and other adult education providers to think about potential barriers students might face in completing their training or degree, such as lack of access to child care or transportation.

January 22, 2016

EvoLLLution (an online newspaper on higher education): Community Colleges and the New Workforce Development Ecosystem

By Darlene Miller, Executive Director, National Council for Workforce Education

Finally, to address the personal barriers and challenges faced by so many students, community colleges must improve their partnerships with local community-based organizations. Nonprofits are well-equipped to provide case management and strong support systems to help students overcome barriers and challenges. Through high-quality education programming, providing a range of academic and non-academic support services, and employer engagement strategies to ensure the partnership meets the demands of local industries, these types of partnerships are able to leverage institutional capacities and resources to ensure student success

January 21, 2016

Duluth News Tribune: Program aims to help people land better-paying jobs

The program has been dubbed Connect Forward, and it will build on five years of work at a Financial Opportunity Center operated by Community Action Duluth and funded primarily by $885,000 already funneled through LISC, to date.

Miller pledged that her organization will assist 150 people through the program in the coming year. She said Community Action provides accessible evening classes twice a week, with coaching, child care and food available on site.

Marissa Jackson came to Community Action Duluth in March 2014 as a young single parent living in her parents’ home. She said staff members helped her create a budget and locate affordable housing, but employment difficulties have been difficult to overcome.

“Finding a job for a single mom is hard, especially when you don’t have child care support,” she said. “Jobs in my field, which is working as a personal care assistant, can be challenging because they often involve working nights and weekends.”

January 21, 2016

Industry Week: Leadership Lab Gives Women in Manufacturing a Boost

The national trade group Women in Manufacturing, along with Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, today announced the creation of a Leadership Lab for Women in Manufacturing. The training program will provide executive education and training to its members in mid- to high-level management roles in manufacturing careers.

January 20, 2016

Costal Courier: Georgia missing a chance to strengthen its workforce

By Melissa Johnson, a policy analyst for the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute

While most adults who rely on cash and food assistance in Georgia lack any education beyond high school, not enough of the state’s workers are trained for so-called middle-skill jobs. Middle-skill jobs require more than a high school diploma but less than a four-year degree.

A new Georgia Budget and Policy Institute report shows how the state could better leverage the potential of safety net programs Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training (SNAP E&T) to build a more skilled workforce. Using these initiatives to educate Georgians with low incomes would have long-term benefits for the state.

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of January 11, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Rachel Linn

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing. 


January 15, 2016

Industry Week: Lifting Families Out of Poverty and Into Advanced Manufacturing Careers (By Dr. Anne M. Kress, President, Monroe Community College, Rochester, N.Y.)

ACCESS: Whether it’s owning a car or paying bus fares, transportation is a significant cost to families that are already struggling to make ends meet. Similarly, the cost of child care may prevent a single parent from pursuing a college education. And individuals who are holding down jobs while going to college might not have enough time to get from work to class.

To remove these barriers, MCC offers training programs in city neighborhoods. We have partnered with community groups such as the Ibero-American Action League, a dual-language human services agency that serves Hispanic residents, to offer educational opportunities right in the communities that would benefit from them most.

To help with child care, we partner with community providers to provide services and have secured state grants to offset costs for students.

January 9, 2016

The Auburn Citizen (Auburn, NY): Palmer: How Employment Pathways helps Cayuga County-area people in poverty find jobs

Employment Pathways is a new program administered by Cayuga/Seneca Community Action Agency and located at Cayuga Community College Cayuga Works Career Center.

The agency has partnered with the Cayuga County Department of Social Services, Cayuga Works Career Center, Cayuga Community College, Cayuga-Onondaga BOCES and several local employers, including TRW Automotive, to address barriers to obtaining and/or retaining employment within our community. Some of the barriers include education, training and/or soft skills deficits, unreliable or no transportation, child care and housing issues, and the shortage of living wage jobs. This collaborative effort engages public, private and nonprofit sectors to connect people in poverty with the community resources necessary to travel the pathway to economic stability.

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of January 4, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Rachel Linn

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing. 


January 5, 2016

The Desert Sun: Coachella Valley Adult School expands services

The adult school leveraged its limited state and federal funding by partnering with County Welfare and Workforce Development programs, dozens of nonprofit organizations and several colleges/ universities and career training programs to help advance the lives of its students. In November, the California Department of Education awarded the Coachella Valley Adult School $457,453 through its Adult Education Block Grant Program to expand and enhance its adult education services. These additional funds are being used to expand and enhance adult education in the east valley including the elimination of educational barriers for students who were unable to attend school because of cost, transportation, or child-care responsibilities. These funds will also be used to establish and enhance career pathways for students seeking employment and opportunities for an increase in wages.

January 4, 2016

Logan Banner (West Virginia): Until FERC approval, 1,000s of pipeline jobs just potential

Workforce development, Gov. Tomblin said, has been a top priority. The Governor hosted the state’s first Workforce Summit in 2015 and, in October, announced an additional $7.6 million in federal funding from the U.S. Department of Labor to help coal miners affected by layoffs and mine closures take advantage of job training and career. The grant funding provides tuition assistance – up to $5,000 – for classroom and online skills training, supports 25 on-the-job training positions and provides meal, travel and child care allowances for both miners and their families.

January 4, 2016

Bryan County News: Workforce legislation may increase Georgia’s economic opportunity (by Melissa Johnson, a policy analyst for the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute)

Expand access to support services. The federal legislation explicitly allows local workforce-development boards to provide support services and need-based payments to help people to go about their lives while they receive training. Help with child care, transportation and housing is crucial to a person’s ability to participate in training.

Georgia can combine state and federal resources to provide added support services so more people can participate in training. The state can also provide technical assistance to communities to combine various federal funding sources for support services and optimizing their delivery. This could include providing child care at certain hours or particular forms of transportation assistance.

January 3, 2016

Lansing State Journal: McDonald: Michigan’s workforce, future depend on degrees

The faculty and staff of Michigan’s higher education institutions welcome the research, goals, and recommendations outlined in the report: “Reaching for Opportunity: An Action Plan to Increase Michigan’s Postsecondary Credential Attainment.”

The report provides specific recommendations to improve the access and success of adult and other non-traditional students entering higher education institutions.

Career and personal counseling are also critical to these students, as are other support services such as: child care, flexible class schedules, and faculty mentoring in addition to instruction. Many of today’s students have work and family responsibilities and very modest incomes.

December 31, 2015

Duluth News Tribune: Economic expert’s view: Duluth needs solution to worker shortage

Record low unemployment rates mask one of the major opportunities in local workforce development. For many underrepresented populations, unemployment rates are still very high. Often, these populations experience barriers to employment that prevent them from entering the workforce. These barriers include but are not limited to a lack of education, a lack of training, access to transportation, criminal backgrounds and a lack of access to child care. In order to develop our local workforce we must begin to address some of the most prevalent barriers to employment so individuals who want to enter the workforce can do so.

December 23, 2015

Womens eNews: ‘Pre-Apprentice’ Programs Can Break Open Jobs for Women (by Katie Spiker, a federal policy analyst for National Skills Coalition. She is a graduate of Georgetown University Law Center and a 2015 Ford Public Voices Fellow.)

As an advocate in this area I have also seen with my own eyes how these programs help participants gain skills and confidence and move them along to jobs that transform their own lives and those of their families.

These programs offer training and support services that can put women on the right track to apprenticeship. It could mean basic computer science exposure for someone who may not have had the course in school, and needs it for an IT certificate. It could also mean support figuring out the best way to manage child care for a working mother, or physical fitness training to ensure the woman standing at a computerized numerical control, or CNC machine, has the endurance to do so.

December 18, 2015

San Francisco Chronicle: JobTrain puts low-income people on path to sustainable employment

JobTrain, a 50-year-old nonprofit that grew out of the Civil Rights movement, still focuses on economic equality through a combination of job training, academics and life skills to help disadvantaged people be self-sufficient.

Support takes a lot of forms. Case managers meet individually with each student. Child care, a wellness facility and access to assistance with food and transportation are all offered on site.

This year, JobTrain created a for-profit company to provide on-the-job training for its students. Wise SV (Workforce Integration Social Enterprise), a joint venture with social enterprise CalSo, operates Rendezvous Cafe & Catering in Redwood Shores. It may add manufacturing and staffing components in the future.

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of December 7, 2015

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Rachel Linn

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing. 


December 14, 2015

LaCrosse Tribune (Wisconsin): 7 Rivers Alliance to spur workforce development with grant program

At the Be Bold forum, five companies outlined a skills gap and the challenge of finding qualified workers. Sean Smith, a supply chain director at Agropur Ingredients in La Crosse, said his company wants to grow and expand but was having difficulties finding enough employees for the production lines already in service.

Whitehall is a challenging area to recruit workers and families. Because of its distance from Eau Claire and La Crosse, public transportation is an issue.

Affordable housing is also a challenge in Whitehall, as is child care, both of which are widespread concerns.

December 11, 2015

Deseret News (Salt Lake City): How do you help families still mired in the Great Recession?

Since Utah’s public assistance and workforce services agencies have not always been connected, low-income families historically had to go to separate offices for help with employment, food stamps and other services, according to Nic Dunn, spokesman for the Utah Department of Workforce Services.

But the department has created “one-stop” centers to ensure that more people know about and receive the various resources available, he said.

“Having that all under one roof where it’s one touch point is way more efficient for these people,” Dunn said. “It has been such a powerful tool to help them get back on their feet a lot more quickly.”

Still, many people don’t realize those centers provide help with nonemployment services, such as food stamps, child care, after-school programs, housing and financial assistance, according to Aguirre.

December 8, 2015

MarketPlace: Job fair encourages girls to get into trades

Construction is a booming industry. But when’s the last time you saw a female construction worker? A female plumber? Turns out, there aren’t very many. Women make up only 2.6 percent of the field. The Women Can Build Career Fair in Hayward, California is trying to address this gender imbalance.

December 7, 2015

WMAZ (Georgia): Program helps train, employ central Georgia workers

The local Director, Shaknita Davis said, “It is our job and responsibility to understand what workforce trends are, what skills are needed from local industry and employers and make sure job seekers on the other side, know what skill sets are needed and then help them acquire those skill sets in order to meet the employer need as well as their need to find employment.”

Davis went on to explain that the program strives to break down any barriers for both employers and employees. “We assist them with tuition, books, fees, licenses, child care, transportation, any type of barrier that would hinder them from being able to obtain those skills that are needed.”

December 5, 2015

The Philadelphia Tribune: YouthBuild, Starbucks initiative takes local woman from homelessness to career

Starbucks has taken the lead locally in a national effort to employ “opportunity youth” such as Williams, young people between the ages of 18 and 24, who are not in school or are unemployed. According to a report commissioned by Boston-based Opportunity Nation almost six million youth are disconnected from school and work.

Through local partnership with organizations such as YouthBuild, Starbucks has hired more than 50 opportunity youth in Philadelphia during the last two years. The company has committed to hiring 10,000 opportunity youth nationally by 2018.

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of November 30, 2015

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Rachel Linn

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


November 30, 2015

Campus Technology: Associates Degree or Cert in CTE Leads to Higher Earnings

People in California who earn a career technical education (CTE) degree or certificate from a community college earn more money — an average increase in income of 33 percent or 13 to 22 percent overall, respectively. Those are two findings from a research project undertaken by the Center for Poverty Research at the University of California, Davis.

The research also found that student characteristics across programs translated into different returns and outcomes. Because women “were much more likely than men to enter health programs,” the policy brief noted, “their average return was higher.” Driven by those high returns, women’s income increased 42 percent with an associate’s degree, compared to 21 percent for men. Women, however, were also more likely to enter the programs with the lowest returns, such as childcare.

 November 30, 2015

Omaha Public Radio: Partnership of Women’s Foundations Pledge $100 Million to Create Pathways to Economic Security

“We are going to be looking at job training, financial literacy, and child care initiatives. These are things that we know help women attain economic self-sufficiency, programs that really help women be able to take care of their families and their communities.”

November 20, 2015

NW Labor Press: Apprenticeship gets some long-overdue recognition

At 6.9 percent, Oregon has more than double the national rate of women in construction trades apprenticeships. According to Connie Ashbrook, executive director of OTI, registered apprenticeship programs in the Portland metropolitan area that her organization partners with have nearly 10 percent women, on average.

Charlie Johnson, business manager of Sheet Metal Workers Local 16, said journeyman sheet metal workers make $38 an hour, with “unparalleled” fringe benefits that include a pension and full medical benefits. “I don’t think there are too many opportunities outside the construction trades that offer that kind of income,” Johnson said.

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of November 16, 2015

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Rachel Linn

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


November 20, 2015

FW: The Magazine for Chicago Women: The Face of a Changing Industry

When one thinks of the construction field, a young woman with a blonde ponytail might not immediately come to mind. But Minnesota native Samantha Randby is an apprentice lineman with Intren. She is one of the 8.9 percent of women who are currently employed within the construction workforce.

November 19, 2015

The Fairfield Sun: Funding helps create pathways to economic security for women

Prosperity Together partners will use their respective experience and knowledge to continue funding programs that are proven effective in their communities and states. The types of programs that will be funded include job training programs that are customized to address the cultural and educational needs of low-income women in order to secure a higher-wage job in a stable work environment.

November 16, 2015

San Gabriel Valley Tribune: Why Metro wants to hire more women for construction jobs

Though Metro doesn’t actually build anything, it contracts with companies that do. Both must fulfill project labor agreements that include hiring a certain percentage of minorities and women.

Federal guidelines say each project should have 6.9 percent women. While some Metro projects are near that, others have less than 1 percent, said Miguel Cabral, Metro’s deputy executive officer of diversity and economic opportunity.

Also covered in Construction Dive: Los Angeles Metro ramps up efforts to recruit women construction workers

November 16, 2015

Birmingham Business Journal: Women’s Fund to invest $2.5M in local job training and child care

The Women’s Fund of Greater Birmingham will be investing $2.5 million over the next five years toward job training for women, child care and economic research.

November 13, 2015

Star Tribune: Women’s foundations pledge $100 million to bolster economic security for American women, families

In Minnesota, money will be allocated to bolster education and job training services, as well as child care, to help women secure higher-wage, stable work, officials said. Funding also will be used for research to inform best practices for policy change.

“A special focus must be placed on women of color, who are on the bottom rung of every economic indicator in Minnesota, just as they are in many states in the nation,” said Lee Roper-Batker, president and CEO of the Women’s Foundation of Minnesota, which will commit $15 million to the effort over the next five years.

 November 13, 2015

Naples Daily News: Women’s Foundation of Southwest Florida joins national initiative to empower disadvantaged

The foundations’ efforts will focus largely on funding job training programs that address educational needs and cultural issues to help low-income women get better jobs. It also will help fund child care programs so mothers can be in the workplace and their children can get an academic start.

November 12, 2015

Construction Dive: Are women the answer to the construction labor shortage?

However, the industry is also facing another shortage — women in the construction trades. Women represent half of the population in the U.S. but, according to a 2014 Bureau of Labor Statistics report, women make up less than 10% of the construction industry workforce. Some groups, like the National Women’s Law Center, peg that figure at 3%, although organizations like the AGC contend their numbers include only women in the field, and not those in administrative or professional positions.

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: 2015 National Apprenticeship Week Round-Up

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Rachel Linn

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


November 8, 2015

Star Tribune: Progress has been slow but steady for women in construction

[Minnesotan Kimberly Brinkman’s] experiences were echoed in the recent survey by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research. One common experience for almost all tradeswomen is being the only woman on the job site. When Brinkman attended the Women Build Nations Conference in Los Angeles last spring, she was brought to tears when she entered a room with over 1,000 tradeswomen. “What a powerful experience,” she said. “It is an act of courage and strength to work in an industry dominated by men,” she continued. “The stories inspired me … to change the status quo.”

November 4, 2015

Oregon Live: Oregon a national leader in recruiting women apprentices but challenges remain

A 2014 report praised Oregon as one of two states making exemplary efforts to improve diversity in the highway construction trades, notably by dedicating a portion of its federal highway funding for training and support services for women and minorities. Having the state pay for such things as child care expenses, mileage, tools and clothing makes it more likely that women can continue their apprenticeships, the report by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research found.

November 4, 2015

Jobs for the Future: Expanding the Path to Apprenticeships to Women and Minority Workers

Pre-apprenticeships are a critical entry point into a training and career pathway for numerous reasons. A good program has deep community ties, and can recruit women and minorities to consider nontraditional occupations and apprenticeship programs as a real option for their future. They teach these individuals the technical skills, contextualized literacy and numeracy skills, and soft skills they need to succeed on the job or in an apprenticeship. Finally, these programs are equipped provide the case management that connects their trainees to the resources they need to overcome their transportation, housing, child care, and other barriers to work.

November 4, 2015

303 Magazine: How Denver Women are Using Cooking to Get off Welfare

However, WOW also provides a slew of advanced training courses that can act as a solution to the cliff effect since students enrolled in courses—such as those for sous chef certification—have the potential to make $35K to $40K a year with complete benefits. Though these extensive training course are not the right fit for every student, WOW does boast a hefty repertoire of ancillary services that supports students at all levels. This includes help with everything from resume writing and interview training, to cognitive behavioral therapy, in-house emergency child care and safety planning for those in domestic violence situations. Some services are even offered throughout their lifetime.

November 4, 2015

San Francisco Chronicle Op-Ed: Apprenticeships offer debt-free job training

By Sean McGarvey, President of North America’s Building Trades Unions

Rather than reinvent the wheel, policymakers should turn to a training infrastructure that’s worked for decades. For a thriving economy, we need to double the number of American apprentices.

Citizens should press their governments and community-based organizations to partner with their local building trades unions to enact robust apprenticeship readiness programs— especially ones that give communities of color, women and veterans a leg up on the ladder to the middle class.

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