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Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of November 16, 2015

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Rachel Linn

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.

November 19, 2015

The Fairfield Sun: Funding helps create pathways to economic security for women

Prosperity Together partners will use their respective experience and knowledge to continue funding programs that are proven effective in their communities and states. The types of programs that will be funded include job training programs that are customized to address the cultural and educational needs of low-income women in order to secure a higher-wage job in a stable work environment.

November 16, 2015

San Gabriel Valley Tribune: Why Metro wants to hire more women for construction jobs

Though Metro doesn’t actually build anything, it contracts with companies that do. Both must fulfill project labor agreements that include hiring a certain percentage of minorities and women.

Federal guidelines say each project should have 6.9 percent women. While some Metro projects are near that, others have less than 1 percent, said Miguel Cabral, Metro’s deputy executive officer of diversity and economic opportunity.

Also covered in Construction Dive: Los Angeles Metro ramps up efforts to recruit women construction workers

November 16, 2015

Birmingham Business Journal: Women’s Fund to invest $2.5M in local job training and child care

The Women’s Fund of Greater Birmingham will be investing $2.5 million over the next five years toward job training for women, child care and economic research.

November 13, 2015

Star Tribune: Women’s foundations pledge $100 million to bolster economic security for American women, families

In Minnesota, money will be allocated to bolster education and job training services, as well as child care, to help women secure higher-wage, stable work, officials said. Funding also will be used for research to inform best practices for policy change.

“A special focus must be placed on women of color, who are on the bottom rung of every economic indicator in Minnesota, just as they are in many states in the nation,” said Lee Roper-Batker, president and CEO of the Women’s Foundation of Minnesota, which will commit $15 million to the effort over the next five years.

 November 13, 2015

Naples Daily News: Women’s Foundation of Southwest Florida joins national initiative to empower disadvantaged

The foundations’ efforts will focus largely on funding job training programs that address educational needs and cultural issues to help low-income women get better jobs. It also will help fund child care programs so mothers can be in the workplace and their children can get an academic start.

November 12, 2015

Construction Dive: Are women the answer to the construction labor shortage?

However, the industry is also facing another shortage — women in the construction trades. Women represent half of the population in the U.S. but, according to a 2014 Bureau of Labor Statistics report, women make up less than 10% of the construction industry workforce. Some groups, like the National Women’s Law Center, peg that figure at 3%, although organizations like the AGC contend their numbers include only women in the field, and not those in administrative or professional positions.

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: 2015 National Apprenticeship Week Round-Up

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Rachel Linn

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.

November 8, 2015

Star Tribune: Progress has been slow but steady for women in construction

[Minnesotan Kimberly Brinkman’s] experiences were echoed in the recent survey by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research. One common experience for almost all tradeswomen is being the only woman on the job site. When Brinkman attended the Women Build Nations Conference in Los Angeles last spring, she was brought to tears when she entered a room with over 1,000 tradeswomen. “What a powerful experience,” she said. “It is an act of courage and strength to work in an industry dominated by men,” she continued. “The stories inspired me … to change the status quo.”

November 4, 2015

Oregon Live: Oregon a national leader in recruiting women apprentices but challenges remain

A 2014 report praised Oregon as one of two states making exemplary efforts to improve diversity in the highway construction trades, notably by dedicating a portion of its federal highway funding for training and support services for women and minorities. Having the state pay for such things as child care expenses, mileage, tools and clothing makes it more likely that women can continue their apprenticeships, the report by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research found.

November 4, 2015

Jobs for the Future: Expanding the Path to Apprenticeships to Women and Minority Workers

Pre-apprenticeships are a critical entry point into a training and career pathway for numerous reasons. A good program has deep community ties, and can recruit women and minorities to consider nontraditional occupations and apprenticeship programs as a real option for their future. They teach these individuals the technical skills, contextualized literacy and numeracy skills, and soft skills they need to succeed on the job or in an apprenticeship. Finally, these programs are equipped provide the case management that connects their trainees to the resources they need to overcome their transportation, housing, child care, and other barriers to work.

November 4, 2015

303 Magazine: How Denver Women are Using Cooking to Get off Welfare

However, WOW also provides a slew of advanced training courses that can act as a solution to the cliff effect since students enrolled in courses—such as those for sous chef certification—have the potential to make $35K to $40K a year with complete benefits. Though these extensive training course are not the right fit for every student, WOW does boast a hefty repertoire of ancillary services that supports students at all levels. This includes help with everything from resume writing and interview training, to cognitive behavioral therapy, in-house emergency child care and safety planning for those in domestic violence situations. Some services are even offered throughout their lifetime.

November 4, 2015

San Francisco Chronicle Op-Ed: Apprenticeships offer debt-free job training

By Sean McGarvey, President of North America’s Building Trades Unions

Rather than reinvent the wheel, policymakers should turn to a training infrastructure that’s worked for decades. For a thriving economy, we need to double the number of American apprentices.

Citizens should press their governments and community-based organizations to partner with their local building trades unions to enact robust apprenticeship readiness programs— especially ones that give communities of color, women and veterans a leg up on the ladder to the middle class.

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of November 2, 2015

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Rachel Linn

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.

November 3, 2015

Journal Star (Peoria, IL): ICC program looks at tech field apprenticeships as entry point for women and minorities

It’s time for women and minorities to be included in the technical revolution. That was the idea behind the Illinois Central College program Tuesday on apprenticeships for minorities and women. The program, part of a week-long celebration at ICC on the importance of apprenticeships, was attended by 120 people.“Only 7 percent of the apprentices in this country at the present time are female. There is also an underrepresentation of minorities among apprentices in our nation,” said Ali, noting that ICC sought to broaden the apprenticeship concept.

October 31, 2015

The Des Moines Register: The struggle to help people find better jobs

Marvin DeJear, director of the Evelyn K. Davis Center for Working Families, said nonprofits and government programs that work with youth have disappeared in recent decades.

The Evelyn K. Davis Center opened in 2012 to act as a clearinghouse of sorts for those seeking work. Aside from working on specific job searching skills, DeJear said, counselors spend much of their time working through personal issues such as child care and transportation.

October 24, 2015

Marietta Daily Journal (Atlanta, Georgia): Local construction training builds careers

Simmons is one of 16 trainees who graduated Friday as the inaugural class of Go Build Cobb, a free four-week construction skills training and employment course aimed at giving people a leg up into a growing industry in metro Atlanta. The program is a partnership between CobbWorks, the Construction Education Foundation of Georgia, The Collective at Cumberland Community Church and HB Next, a business management consulting company.

Simmons said she aspires to build a career for herself and encourage other women to take advantage of opportunities in construction, a traditionally male-dominated field. “I love hands-on, I love building. I love seeing the outcome of my time and my effort,” said Simmons. “If I go on site and do my best like I’ve done in this class, I mean, I can see myself really moving up.”

But for the unemployed or underemployed, attending a four-week course can be a struggle. Only half the participants have both a car and a valid license, and many cannot afford to pay for transportation in addition to going without pay for the period of training and however long it takes them to find a job afterwards.

October 19, 2015

KAJO 1270 (Oregon) RCC Awarded Grant To Help Low-Income Students Gets Jobs in Health Care

A $14.6 million federal grant awarded to Rogue Community College will benefit nearly 1,100 new low-income students in job training and education programs for health careers.

Students already enrolled in college-level programs at RCC cannot apply. A news release says applicants who qualify will be put into a lottery and selected from that pool. The grant funds will also be able to pay for child care, emergency food and housing support and transportation.

October 14, 2015

The Missouri Times: Missouri to use $15 million grant to provide job training for health care careers, Gov. Nixon announces

The JETS partnership will offer a combination of classroom learning, on-the-job training, and distance learning opportunities to improve access to the necessary skills and knowledge for these health professions.  Those currently working as a certified nursing assistant (CNA) or a licensed practical nurse (LPN) or other entry level positions may be eligible for the JETS program and use the training to move to the next level in their profession.  Participants will also get support to overcome barriers to employment including child care and transportation needs.

October 10, 2015

The Tampa Tribune: Building a future for women in construction industry

The second round of seminars for Women Building Futures, a program that gives women a sneak peek at carpentry, plumbing, painting, flooring installation and construction drawings, begins this week. Once they’ve finished that program, if they decide to take advantage of an apprenticeship, women can become certified in any number of trades that could boost their income considerably — at very little cost to them.

“When the Women’s Centre started in 1977, this was one of their first programs,” said Women Building Futures program manager Luis Rodriguez, who signed up 24 women for the first set of workshops. “The idea was to help women step into roles traditionally held by male breadwinners.”

September 14, 2015

Hometown Source: Minnesota receives $5M federal grant to expand registered apprenticeship in high-growth jobs

The grant partners the Department of Economic and Employee Development (DEED) and Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) with employers to support activities including outreach and recruiting, assessments, adult basic education, wrap-around support services and on-the-job and industry recognized credential training.

As of September 2015, Minnesota reached a high mark of almost 11,000 registered apprentices; up from approximately 6,600 in 2011. Minnesota’s apprenticeship employers and the state’s construction labor unions have increased their focus on outreach and recruiting of women and minorities. These efforts have resulted in the number of apprentices that are women and minorities rising from 17 percent in 2011 to 26 percent in 2015.

August 24, 2015

The Chicago Tribune: Dold: $100M program would move people from welfare to workforce

Currently under review in a U.S. House committee, the Accelerating Individuals into the Workforce Act would provide wage assistance for employers to help create more employment opportunities. States would receive federal funds to subsidize employment for those already identified as eligible Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, or TANF, recipients, under the plan.

Tamera Wallace, a 20-year-old Waukegan resident, described her struggles as a single mother trying to find and hold a job to pay the bills. Transportation and child care, she said, are the two biggest issues faced by job-seekers such as herself.

August 21, 2015

WCPO Cincinnati: Mom who left kids alone for job training faces charges

A mom seeking a job is facing charges for leaving her three young kids alone in a case that should remind parents that there is free or cheap child-care available if they need it.

Dozier went across the street for job orientation at Wendy’s and admitted she knew she would be leaving her kids unattended for at least a half hour. But she was desperate for a job, she said.

August 20, 2015

Maine Women Magazine: Non-traditional training can build better future

Founded in 1988, Women Unlimited helps Maine residents move toward earning a livable wage through access to and support of trade, technical, and transportation careers. The nonprofit, which receives the majority of its funding from federal and state sources, began as a welfare-to-work program for single mothers but has grown to aid in the “economic well-being of Maine women, minorities, and disadvantaged workers.”

August 12, 2015 (Alabama): RSTC awarded workforce grant

Reid State Technical College has been awarded a Workforce Innovation and Opportunity ACT (WIOA) grant that will allow youth to obtain education and employability skills. This act will enable youth with difficulties seeking employment to gain on-the-job training opportunities, academic, and occupational skills training.

In order to help alleviate some of the financial burdens that can arise for students, Reid State will offer incentives that could help motivate them to keep pushing forward. Students who participate regularly by taking advantage of the services being offered thru the grant will be allowed to capitalize on their commitment. Eligible students may receive a gas card once a week or every other week and/or receive child care services at least two days a week.

July 22, 2015

The Unionville Times (West Chester, PA): County announces new job training, support initiative

The Chester County Commissioners and the Chester County Workforce Development Board announced Tuesday the start of Platform to Employment (P2E), a program that provides job readiness training, personal support services, finance counseling and paid work experience with the intent to secure jobs for individuals who have experienced long-term unemployment in Chester County.

In addition to intensive career readiness workshops, P2E incorporates financial stability counseling and mental health counseling to help address the inevitable stress factors that long-term unemployment status places upon people.

July 21, 2015

Industry Week: Closing the Gender Gap, and with It, the Skills Gap

A new study finds that manufacturing can attract more women by making a concerted effort to recruit them through their social networks; retaining them through mentorships, better pay and more flexible hours; and fostering girls’ interest in manufacturing careers as early as fourth grade.

Socioeconomic Supports in Job Training Programs: How You Can Help Determine their Value

This post originally appeared in the August/September 2015 edition of NAWDP Advantage, the newsletter of the National Association of Workforce Development Professionals. September is designated as Workforce Development Month.

By Rachel Linn, Communications Associate, and Cynthia Hess, Study Director

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers, yet many adults face economic, scheduling, and other challenges that make it difficult for them to enroll and succeed in job training programs. Socioeconomic supports—or wraparound services, such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete job training programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.

Socioeconomic supports, as a route to job training access and success, are especially important for women, who increasingly serve as breadwinners for their families, but still face a pay gap. The Institute for Women’s Policy Research found that as of 2013, women were the primary or co-breadwinner in half of families with children under age 18 in the United States — yet women continue to earn less, and experience higher poverty than comparable men.

Evaluation research points to the importance of socioeconomic support services for job training completion and success. An evaluation of nine sectoral programs found that supportive services were often necessary to help participants complete job training and obtain jobs. In particular, Project QUEST, a community-based workforce development program in San Antonio, had higher completion rates than other training programs of similar duration, which the evaluator attributed to the strong support system that Project QUEST provides. An evaluation of the outcomes of participants in three job training programs in Maryland, Missouri, and New Mexico that implement an approach developed by the Center for Working Families (which bundles core services for participants) found that integrated service delivery was associated with the completion of job training or degree programs, as well as job retention and advancement. In all of the programs, the highest achievers were more likely to have received wraparound services, compared with all other participants.

Despite anecdotal evidence and some studies pointing to the importance of wraparound supports for job training participants, little is known about how many job training programs offer supports of different types and which supports best meet the needs of low-income women, who typically have more caregiving responsibilities than comparable men. IWPR recently launched a research initiative to address this gap. “Socioeconomic Supports and Women’s Job Training Success,” seeks to improve knowledge about the landscape of socioeconomic support provision within the U.S. workforce development system and stimulate national dialogue about the importance of these supports in promoting job training success.

Funded by the Walmart Foundation, the initiative will use a variety of research methods—including a literature review, expert interviews, a promising practices study, and online surveys of administrators and participants from job training programs—to gather and examine information on the prevalence of socioeconomic supports in job training programs, their perceived effectiveness, and promising practices in service support delivery. The project will produce a series of research products and hold outreach activities to promote dialogue among program leaders, advocates, policymakers, and workforce development researchers.

The project aims to provide information that can help programs, and the workforce development system as a whole, effectively target their investments in socioeconomic supports. To help with this study, IWPR is seeking input from professionals in the field as well as job training participants. Please contact Rachel Linn if you would like to participate in a survey, as a part of this national study, or have suggestions for programs that are effectively providing socioeconomic supports.

Equal Pay for Women Can Cut Poverty in Half, Boost Wages Significantly, AND Grow the Economy. Can Any Other Policy Lever Do That?

by Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D.

Every September, the U.S. Census Bureau releases its update on income and poverty in the United States. I—along with many other economists, policy wonks, data geeks, and others—impatiently refresh the website to learn whether there has been any improvement in men’s and women’s earnings, the wage gap, or the poverty rate. In recent years, the significance of each release has been characterized by its insignificance: since 2007, there has not been a statistically significant narrowing of the gender wage gap, and between 2013 and 2014, there was not a statistically significant difference in the poverty rate.  Moreover, adjusted for inflation, the last ten years have seen virtually no increase in women’s earnings, so women are now experiencing what men have experienced for more than three decades—the failure of real wages to grow.

According to the new Census data, women now earn 79 cents for every dollar a man earns for full-time, year-round work; actually that’s 78.6 cents compared with a new estimate for the prior year of 78.3 cents, a small gain indeed.  The gap is even wider for most women of color, with Black women earning only 59.8 cents on the white man’s dollar, and Hispanic women only 54.6 cents on the white man’s dollar. By projecting the rate of progress from 1960 forward, the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) has found that women will not see equal pay until 2059, one year longer than IWPR’s previous projection. As a clever segment on The Daily Show noted, wage equality for women will take longer to achieve than flying cars or 3D-printed human organs. For an economy that left the Great Recession behind six years ago, this stagnation is beyond frustrating.

Such a wide gap has compound effects over a woman’s lifetime: the typical woman will lose $530,000 over the course of her lifetime due to the wage gap; a college educated woman will lose $800,000. For an individual woman, this is an incredible, undeserved reduction in her lifetime earnings, compromising her ability to save for assets like a house or retirement fund or simply to make ends meet.

For families, the gender wage gap can make the difference between living below or above the poverty line, having funds for recreation and vacations or having none, having access to high-quality child care, schools, and colleges, or only being able to afford poorer quality alternatives or no pre-kindergarten or post-secondary education at all.

Equal Pay_PovertyFor the economy overall, unequal pay is holding back economic growth. IWPR estimates that nearly 60 percent of women would gain pay if they were paid the same as men with similar qualifications and hours of work.  Added across the U.S. economy, these gains amount to 2.9 percent of GDP, a growth rate equivalent to adding another state the size of Virginia. (This type of estimate assumes, of course, that, because of discrimination and other factors, women are currently paid below the level of their productivity; it also assumes no change in women’s education or work hours, which would surely increase if women could expect to earn equal pay.) Each woman, including those who would gain nothing, would earn $6,251 more annually on average, reducing poverty by half for all families with a working woman as well as working women who live alone.

But ensuring that women receive equal pay is not as easy as just paying women more for their work (though that would be a good start!). Businesses and policymakers both have a role to play to achieve the benefits of equal pay well before 2059. You can read my recommendations for how private and public policies can narrow, and eventually eliminate, the gender wage gap over at Fortune. (Hint: we need to address wage inequality by bringing up the bottom of the pay scale, and we also need to close the gender care gap.) It’s time we start taking achieving equal pay seriously.

Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., is an economist, MacArthur Fellow, and president of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, a nonprofit research institute in Washington, DC.

How Partners are Using IWPR’s Status of Women in the States Data

By Sarah Blugis, Communications Intern and Rachel Linn, Communications Associate

IWPR partnered with over 50 local, state, and national organizations for Status of Women in the States: 2015. Using Status of Women data, policymakers and advocates reach out to the media and raise awareness about women’s needs in the states and communities to advance the interest of women and their families.

The Seattle-based Women’s Funding Alliance is using findings from the Status of Women in the States to focus attention on women’s leadership and economic opportunity in Washington State. In addition to giving interviews to NPR affiliate KPLU and The Seattle Times, Women’s Funding Alliance staff traveled throughout Washington to share the data with employers, policymakers, program providers, funders, and advocates.

The Women’s Fund of Southeastern Massachusetts localized IWPR’s data for counties in their area, highlighting poverty rates in nearby cities, and held a press conference with the Mayor of New Bedford, MA. The group also sat down with local editorial boards to present data from the Status of Women in the States report, resulting in stories about the gender wage gap in the Fall River Herald and an interview with WBZ News Radio.

In Utah, the local YWCA issued a press release that generated media coverage on local TV, the local NPR affiliate KUER Utah, and in the Salt Lake Tribune. The Permanent Commission on the Status of Women in Connecticut has also used the data to attract coverage from the Hartford Business Journal, WTNH TV,, and

In Pittsburgh, the Women and Girls Foundation of Southwest Pennsylvania uses the Status of Women in the States report to inform their advocacy and grantmaking strategy. Their annual GirlGov program is designed to provide local girls with the opportunity to learn, first hand, about civics, government, philanthropy, community involvement, women’s history, and leadership. IWPR’s data on women in political leadership in the state was used to contextualize the importance of the program in a segment on WESA, Pittsburgh’s NPR affiliate. The Women and Girls Foundation have also presented findings to their board of directors and donors and hosted briefings for members of the media, policymakers, and advocates to increase investment in women and girls’ health, education, and economic security in the region.

IWPR hopes that its partners across the country will continue using the Status of Women in the States report and accompanying interactive website ( to inform their own advocacy, educate their communities, and advance the status of women in their states and the country overall.

Foreword to Get to the Bricks: The Experiences of Black Women from New Orleans Public Housing after Hurricane Katrina

by Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D.

This foreword appears in the IWPR report, Get to the Bricks: The Experiences of Black Women from New Orleans Public Housing after Hurricane Katrina.

D506 thumbThis report is the culmination of a five-year research project exploring the experiences of women who lived in public housing when Hurricane Katrina made landfall in 2005 and the levees protecting the city of New Orleans failed.  It presents a comprehensive analysis of the interview responses of 184 low-income black women who were living in “The Big Four”—four large housing projects within the city of New Orleans, known as “the Bricks”—and who were displaced by the twin disasters of the hurricane and the flooding. The analysis is based on in-depth ethnographic interviews with the women conducted over a two-year period from 2008 to 2010, when many of them remained displaced in other cities while some had returned to find a different city than the one they had known.

The housing these women had been living in, and which had remained structurally sound during and after the storm, was demolished as part of an effort by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the Housing Authority of New Orleans (HANO) to replace large public housing projects with mixed-income developments. City services were no longer conveniently concentrated near public housing, and public transit was much curtailed compared with before the storm. For those in other cities, obtaining information about what services and benefits were availabe to them and living in areas with only sparse public transportation were often confusing and disheartening and presented barriers to their ability to settle their children in schools and find employment.  Some displaced women and their children found good opportunities in their new cities, but others longed to return to New Orleans.  All of them experienced the breakup of their long standing family and community networks that had provided them with virutally uncountable forms of support—from child and elder care to sharing food and transportation and job leads.

The failure to coordinate services, to plan for the needs of a vulnerable population, to keep families and neighborhood networks together as much as possible, both during the evacuation and throughout their resettlement (which often required more than one move), and to find ways to enable all those who desired to return to New Orleans to do so constitute a third disaster, one like the failure of the levees of human origin.

Finally, during the period these families were struggling with the immediate aftermath of survival, displacement, and relocation, the United States was also experiencing the worst of the Great Recession with its long and slow recovery, the longest reession since the Great Depression in the 1930s, consituting yet a fourth disaster confronting these women and their families.

Yet through it all, these women showed courage, determination, and resiliency as they sought to keep their children and themselves safe and move on with their lives. Theirs is a remarkable story and I invite you to hear their voices in Get to the Bricks: The Experiences of Black Women from New Orleans Public Housing after Hurricane Katrina.

IWPR researchers, under the able leadership of Dr. Jane Henrici, former study director and now senior research fellow at IWPR, interviewed these women in their homes or other locations in New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and Houston. The Katrina disapora spread well beyond these relativley nearby cities to virtually every state in the nation. The Katrina migration will likely remain one of the largest and longest lasting in American history that stemmed originally from a natural disaster, compounded as it was by the disasters of human engineering. As such, Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath, as seen through these women’s eyes, have much to teach us about how we can improve public policy and disaster planning in the years to come.

In addition to Dr. Henrici and the many researchers who assisted her in this work, I would like to single out for thanks Prof. Kai Erikson of Yale University, who invited IWPR to join the Social Science Research Council’s Katrina project and to participate in its deliberations, as well as Josh Jarrett, Program Officer, and Hillary Pennington, Director of Education, Postsecondary Success & Special Initiatives, at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, who generously provided the funding to conduct the interviews and analyze the results.  Dr. Avis Jones-DeWeever, a former IWPR study director, also deserves special thanks for her early interviews in post-disaster New Orleans, which alerted us to the depth of the struggles these women were facing.  For all of us at IWPR, this report is a fitting culmination to the research we began on the Monday after the hurricane hit, producing many fact sheets, briefing papers, book chapters, and short reports detailing, through both quantitative and qualitative analysis, the conditions faced by the women of New Orleans both before and after the storm.  We wish for them and their families a secure and successful future. And it is our hope that their voices will have lasting impact on public policy.

Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., is the President and CEO of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research. Read the full report, Get to the Bricks: The Experiences of Black Women from New Orleans Public Housing after Hurricane Katrina, at

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