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Kevin Miller, Ph.D., Senior Research Associate

Dr. Miller joined IWPR in July 2008, having previously worked with IWPR as a consultant on the costs of state preschool expansions, the status of girls, and child care. Dr. Miller holds undergraduate degrees in psychology and political science from the University of Illinois and received his doctorate in social psychology at the Ohio State University. He authors publications, testifies before state and city lawmakers, and conducts technical assistance and data analysis for IWPR’s projects on job quality, paid leave, and postsecondary education. Reports authored at IWPR include The Need for Paid Parental Leave for Federal Employees: Adapting to a Changing Workforce (2009) and Improving Child Care Access to Promote Postsecondary Success Among Low-Income Student Parents (2011).

Latest Reports from IWPR

Recommendations for an Evaluation of the District of Columbia’s Paid Sick Days Law
by Kevin Miller, Ph.D. (September 2012)

This briefing paper presents recommendations for the evaluation and report on the Accrued Sick and Safe Leave Act of 2008.1 One provision of the Act, which mandates that employers in the District of Columbia provide paid sick days to some employees, requires the Auditor of the District of Columbia to prepare and submit a report on the Act’s impact.

 

Valuing Good Health in Massachusetts: The Costs and Benefits of Paid Sick Days
by Kevin Miller, Ph.D. and Claudia Williams (May 2012)

This report uses data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, and the U.S. Census Bureau to evaluate the likely impact of the Massachusetts Act Establishing Earned Paid Sick Time. The study is one of a series of analyses by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) examining the costs and benefits of paid sick days policies. It estimates how much time off Massachusetts workers would use under the proposed policy and the costs to employers for that sick time. It also uses findings from previous peer-reviewed research to estimate how this leave policy would save money, by reducing turnover, cutting down on the spread of disease at work, helping employers avoid paying for low productivity, holding down nursing-home stays, and reducing norovirus outbreaks in nursing homes.

 

Valuing Good Health in Massachusetts: The Costs and Benefits of Paid Sick Days (Executive Summary)
by Kevin Miller, Ph.D. and Claudia Williams (May 2012)

This report uses data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, and the U.S. Census Bureau to evaluate the likely impact of the Massachusetts Act Establishing Earned Paid Sick Time. The study is one of a series of analyses by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) examining the costs and benefits of paid sick days policies. It estimates how much time off Massachusetts workers would use under the proposed policy and the costs to employers for that sick time. It also uses findings from previous peer-reviewed research to estimate how this leave policy would save money, by reducing turnover, cutting down on the spread of disease at work, helping employers avoid paying for low productivity, holding down nursing-home stays, and reducing norovirus outbreaks in nursing homes.

 

Paid Sick Days in Massachusetts Would Lower Health Care Costs by Reducing Unnecessary Emergency Department Visits
by Kevin Miller, Ph.D., and Claudia Williams (May 2012)

Thirty-six percent of working Massachusetts residents, or approximately 910,000 employees, lack access to paid sick days. This fact sheet reports findings from research by the Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR) on how increased access to paid sick days would improve both access to health care and health outcomes in Massachusetts. The research also quantifies the savings gained by providing access to paid sick days to all workers, thereby preventing some emergency department visits in Massachusetts.

 

Paid Time Off: The Elements and Prevalence of Consolidated Leave Plans
by Andrea Lindemann, CLASP and Kevin Miller, IWPR (May 2012)

Paid Time Off (PTO) banks are an alternative to traditional paid leave plans that consolidate multiple types of leave (paid vacation, sick, and personal days) into a single plan. An employer does not designate leave for any particular reason, but instead simply gives employees one “bucket” of leave. Nearly one in five employees in the United States receive leave in the form of a PTO bank, but the contours of such policies are often little understood—especially outside of the human resources community. While private consulting firms have published studies on the use of such plans in the private sector for years, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) just began releasing some information about consolidated leave plans (i.e., PTO banks) in 2010. This report explores what is known, and what needs more study, about PTO banks. Other issues that may be addressed in later publications are union presence and PTO banks, the pros and cons for both employers and employees of offering PTO banks, the legal effects of state laws requiring payout of vacation time, how PTO banks work with no-fault absence policies, and the potential impacts of PTO banks on policy proposals.

 

Single Student Parents Face Financial Difficulties, Debt, Without Adequate Aid
by Kevin Miller, Ph.D. (May 2012)

Parents with dependent children were nearly one quarter of students enrolled for credit at American postsecondary institutions in 2008. These students face significant challenges to remaining enrolled and graduating, including limited access to affordable child care, difficulty balancing the demands of school with the demands of work and family, and financial limitations that make it difficult to remain enrolled. Student parents are more likely than traditional students to say that financial difficulties are likely to result in their withdrawing from college (Miller, Gault, and Thorman 2011).

 

Paid Sick Days in New York City Would Lower Health Care Costs by Reducing Unnecessary Emergency Department Visits
by Kevin Miller, Ph.D. and Claudia Williams (February 2012)

In New York City, 50 percent of working New Yorkers, or approximately 1,580,000 employees, lack access to paid sick days. This fact sheet reports findings from research by the Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR) on how increased access to paid sick days would improve both access to health care and health outcomes in New York City. The research also quantifies the savings gained by providing access to paid sick days to all workers, thereby preventing some emergency department visits in New York City.

 
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