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Jeffrey Hayes, Ph.D., Study Director

Jeff joined IWPR in September 2009 and works on projects examining women’s and men’s employment, job quality, and economic security over the life course using national survey data. He worked previously at the McGill Institute for Health and Social Policy and the Harvard Project on Global Working Families analyzing child and family well-being with a focus on how socioeconomic status and labor conditions affect children’s health and development around the world. Prior to that, Jeff taught research methods and managed the Social Science Data Lab at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He holds master's and Ph.D. degrees in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a bachelor's in Sociology and Religious Studies from the University of Virginia.

Latest Reports from IWPR

Paid Sick Days Access Varies by Race/Ethnicity, and Job Characteristics
by Rachel O'Connor, Jeff Hayes, Ph.D., Barbara Gault, Ph.D. (July 2014)

Paid sick days bring multiple benefits to employers, workers, families, and communities at large. The economic and public health benefits of paid sick leave coverage are substantial, including safer work environments; reduced spread of contagion; and reduced health care costs. Access to this important benefit, however, is still too rare, and is unequally distributed across the U.S. population, with substantial differences by race and ethnicity, occupation, earnings levels, and work schedules. New data also reveals differences by sexual orientation, especially for men.

 

As Foreign-Born Worker Population Grows, Many Lack Paid Sick Days
by Alex Wang, Jeffrey Hayes, and Liz Ben - Ishai (July 2014)

Research demonstrates that low-wage workers and people of color are least likely to have access to paid sick days.This brief builds on previous research to provide an analysis of immigrant access to sick days using data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS).

 
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Access to Paid Sick Days by Place of Work in the Chicago Metropolitan Area
by Claudia Williams and Jeff Hayes, Ph.D. (February 2014)

 

How Equal Pay for Working Women would Reduce Poverty and Grow the American Economy
by Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., Jeffrey Hayes, Ph.D., and Jennifer Clark (January 2014)

Persistent earnings inequality for working women translates into lower pay, less family income, and more poverty in families with a working woman, which is of no small consequence to working families. About 71 percent of all mothers in the United States work for pay. Of these, about two-thirds (68 percent) are married and typically have access to men’s incomes, but married women’s earnings are nevertheless crucial to family support. One-third (32 percent) are single mothers and often the sole support of their families. And many without children, both single and married, work to support themselves and other family members. This briefing paper summarizes analyses of the 2010-2012 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic supplement and uses statistical controls for labor supply, human capital, and labor market characteristics to estimate: 1) how much women’s earnings and family incomes would rise with equal pay; 2) how much women and their families lose because women earn less than similarly qualified men; and 3) how much the economy as a whole suffers from inequality in pay between women and men.

 

How Education Pays Off for Older Americans
by Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D. and Jeff Hayes (December 2013)

This report presents findings from an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the 2005-2009 American Community Survey data regarding the earnings of older men and women with different levels of education. The analysis was funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and is part of IWPR’s on-going research concerning the economic status and security of older women and men.

 

Valuing Good Health in Newark: The Costs and Benefits of Earned Sick Time
by Claudia Williams, Susan Andrzejewski, and Jeff Hayes, Ph.D. (December 2013)

This briefing paper uses data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the New Jersey Department of Health, and the U.S. Census Bureau to evaluate costs and benefits of Newark’s Worker Sick Leave Ordinance. It estimates how much time off Newark workers would use under the proposed policy and the costs to employers for that earned sick time. This analysis also uses findings from previous peer-reviewed research to estimate cost-savings associated with the proposed policy, through reduced turnover, reduced spread of contagious disease in the workplace, prevention of productivity losses from employees working while sick, minimized nursing-home stays, and reduced norovirus outbreaks in nursing homes. The study is one of a series of analyses by IWPR examining the effects of earned sick day policies.

 

Valuing Good Health in the District of Columbia: The Costs and Benefits of the Earned Sick and Safe Leave Amendment Act of 2013
by Claudia Williams and Jeff Hayes, Ph.D. (October 2013)

Using the parameters of the proposed legislation and publicly available data, the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) estimates some of the anticipated costs and benefits to employees and employers that will result from providing earned sick days to newly covered workers. This analysis focuses specifically on the costs and benefits associated with potential new coverage in the restaurant industry, and part-time and recently hired workers in all occupations and industries.

 

Gender Poverty Gap Grows in Recovery: Men's Poverty Dropped Since Recession, Women's Poverty Stagnates
by Jeffrey Hayes, Ph.D., Barbara Gault, Ph.D., and Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D. (September 2013)

The persistent gap in male and female poverty has been growing during the economic recovery, with 16.3 percent of females, and 13.6 percent of males living in poverty in 2012. The gender poverty gap reached an historic low in 2010 just after the official end of the recession, when 16.2 percent of females, and 14.0 percent of males lived in poverty (Figure 1).

 

Gender Wage Gap Projected to Close in Year 2058: Most Women Working Today Will Not See Equal Pay during their Working Lives
by Jeff Hayes, Ph.D. (September 2013)

 

The Importance of Social Security in the Incomes of Older Americans: Differences by Gender, Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Marital Status
by Jocelyn Fischer and Jeff Hayes, Ph.D. (August 2013)

Social Security is the largest source of income for most older Americans and is even more vital to particular demographic subgroups of older Americans. Analyzing the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) for calendar year 2011, this briefing paper examines the role of Social Security and other income sources in the retirement security of older Americans. It explores the unique value of Social Security to different gender, age, race/ethnic, and marital groups. It finds that significant shares of the older population rely on Social Security for the majority of their income and that Social Security lifts 14.8 million people out of poverty.

 

Memorandum: Proposed temporary caregiver insurance (TCI) within Rhode Island’s Temporary Disability Insurance (TDI) program
by Jeff Hayes (June 2013)

IWPR has calculated estimates of the cost of providing temporary caregiver insured leave proposed under Rhode Island's S 0231, which would provide up to eight (8) weeks of wage replacement benefits to workers who take time off work to care for a seriously ill child, spouse, parent, domestic partner, or to bond with a new child.

 

Valuing Good Health in Oregon: The Costs and Benefits of Earned Sick Days
by Claudia William, Jasmin Griffin, and Jeffrey Hayes (May 2013)

This briefing paper uses data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Oregon Public Health Division, and the U.S. Census Bureau to evaluate costs and benefits of Oregon’s House Bill 3390. It estimates how much time off Oregon workers would use under the proposed policy and the costs to employers for that sick time. This analysis also uses findings from previous peer-reviewed research to estimate cost-savings associated with the proposed policy, through reduced turnover, reduced spread of contagious disease in the workplace, prevention of productivity losses from employees working while sick, minimized nursing-home stays, and reduced norovirus outbreaks in nursing homes. The study is one of a series of analyses by IWPR examining the effects of earned sick days policies.

 

The Gendered Dynamics of Income Security: How Social Science Research Can Identify Pathways Out of Poverty and Toward Economic Security
by Courtney Kishbaugh and Jeffrey Hayes, Ph.D. (May 2013)

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) addressed issues of women, poverty and income security issues from its beginnings. IWPR’s first publication on these topics, Low-Wage Jobs and Workers: Trends and Options for Change (published in 1989), finds a growing share of adults working in low-wage jobs and a growing share of families relying on low-wage work for a major share of family income. It also finds that women and people of color are far more likely to work in low-wage jobs than white males. Federal or federally-funded data sets analyzed for the study included the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) and the Panel Study on Income Dynamics (PSID). Low-Wage Jobs and Workers, a report funded by the U.S. Department of Labor and jointly disseminated with the non-profit Women Work! (then the National Displaced Homemakers Network), became the first of many influential policy pieces centered on poverty and income security. Since then, IWPR has continued to expand its research on poverty issues, focusing primarily on the topics of Social Security and older women’s economic security, welfare reform and its impact on women and children, the impact of unemployment on low-income women and their families, and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in the Gulf Coast region. IWPR’s work has shed light on the experiences and needs of particularly vulnerable and underserved communities, inspired national and international conversations about these issues, and informed policy change.

 

Valuing Good Health in Vermont: The Costs and Benefits of Earned Health Care Time
by Claudia Williams with assistance from Jasmin Griffin and Jeffrey Hayes (April 2013)

The briefing paper uses data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Vermont Department of Health, and the U.S. Census Bureau to evaluate costs and benefits of Vermont’s H.208. It estimates how much time off Vermont workers would use under the proposed policy and the costs to employers for that sick time. This analysis also uses findings from previous peer-reviewed research to estimate cost-savings associated with the policy, through reduced turnover, reduced spread of contagious disease in the workplace, prevention of productivity losses from employees working while sick, minimized nursing-home stays, and reduced norovirus outbreaks in nursing homes. The study is one of a series of analyses by IWPR examining the effects of earned health care time policies.

 

Quality Employment for Women in the Green Economy: Industry, Occupation, and State-by-State Job Estimates
by Ariane Hegewisch, Jeff Hayes, Ph.D., Tonia Bui, Anlan Zhang (April 2013)

This report provides the first-ever estimates of women’s employment in the green economy, state-by-state, by industry, and by occupation. The analysis draws on the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey; the Brookings-Battelle Clean Economy database; and the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics Green Goods and Services survey. The report examines women’s share of employment in the occupations predicted to see the highest growth in the green economy and includes two alternative state-by-state estimates for growth in green jobs. Focusing on investments in green buildings and retrofits, the report includes a state-by-state analysis of employment in key construction occupations by age, race, ethnicity, and gender. This report was funded by a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation’s Sustainable Employment in a Green US Economy (SEGUE) Program. It is the first of a series of publications investigating strategies for improving women’s access to quality employment in the green economy; future reports will address good practices in workforce development for women in the green economy.

#C402, Report, 72 pages
$20.00
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The Gender Wage Gap in New York State and Its Solutions
by Ariane Hegewish, Jeff Hayes, Heidi Hartmann, Jocelyn Fischer, Claudia Williams, Justine Augeri (December 2012)

 

Job Growth and Unemployment for Men and Women in Pennsylvania, 2007 to 2011
by Ariane Hegewisch, Anlan Zhang, Jeffrey Hayes, Ph.D., and Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D. (September 2012)

Since the beginning of the Great Recession in December of 2007 both women and men in Pennsylvania have experienced dramatic job losses and steep increases in unemployment. Almost three years after the official end of the recession, neither women’s nor men’s employment has reached pre-recession levels, but men’s employment gain has been considerably stronger than women’s. The gap between the number of women and men employed in Pennsylvania was wider at the end of 2011 than it was at the outset of the Great Recession. Women have not gained in the recovery relative to men.

 

How Increasing Breastfeeding Rates Will Affect WIC Expenditures: Saving Money While Meeting the Goals of Healthy People 2020
by Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., Jeffrey Hayes, Ph.D., and Youngmin Yi (August 2012)

This report analyzes the cost structure of WIC food packages in relation to breastfeeding, including estimates of total spending on each of the different packages, and estimates of total costs from simulations if Healthy People 2020 breastfeeding goals were reached.

#B307, Report, 35 pages
$10.00
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A Clearer View of Poverty: How the Supplemental Poverty Measure Changes Our Perceptions of Who Is Living in Poverty
by Jocelyn Fischer and Jeff Hayes, Ph.D. (July 2012)

In response to concerns about the adequacy of the official federal poverty measure, a new Supplemental Poverty Measure was recently developed to more accurately assess poverty. This fact sheet presents a rather different picture of poverty in the United States for the various demographic groups based on the Supplemental Poverty Measure and compares this new picture to the understanding of poverty based on the official measure, using data for the 2010 calendar year.

 
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A Clearer View of Poverty: How the Supplemental Poverty Measure Changes Our Perceptions of Who is Living in Poverty
by Jocelyn Fischer and Jeffrey Hayes, Ph.D (July 2012)

 
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