Informing policy. Inspiring change. Improving lives.
1200 18th Street NW, Suite 301
Washington, DC 20036
202 785-5100
iwpr@iwpr.org

Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., President

Heidi Hartmann is the President of the Washington-based Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR), a scientific research organization that she founded in 1987 to meet the need for women-centered, policy-oriented research. She is an economist with a B.A. from Swarthmore College and M. Phil and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University, all in economics. Dr. Hartmann is also a Research Professor at The George Washington University.

Dr. Hartmann lectures internationally on women, economics, and public policy; frequently testifies before the U.S. Congress; and is often cited as an authority in various media outlets, such as CNN, ABC News, The New York Times, and PBS NewsHour. She has published numerous articles in journals and books and her work has been translated into more than a dozen languages. She is a co-author of several IWPR reports, including Women’s and Men’s Employment and Unemployment in the Great Recession; Still A Man’s Labor Market: The Long-Term Earnings Gap; Unnecessary Losses: Costs to Americans of the Lack of Family and Medical Leave; Equal Pay for Working Families, and Strengthening Social Security for Women. She also serves as Secretary/Treasurer of the National Council of Women’s Organizations and Editor of the Journal of Women, Politics & Policy, and served as the Chair of the Board of the American Academy of Political and Social Science.

Prior to founding IWPR, Dr. Hartmann was on the faculties of Rutgers University and the New School for Social Research and worked at the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences and the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. In 1994, Dr. Hartmann was the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship Award for her work in the field of women and economics. She is the recipient of two honorary degrees.

Commentary

Closing the Gender Gap in the Feds Hallowed Halls --The American Prospect
Women Bear Brunt of Union-busting -- Politico

Latest Reports from IWPR

Enhancing Social Security for Women and other Vulnerable Americans: What the Experts Say
by Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D. (July 2014)

This report was conducted by Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) to gather expert opinion about the likely direction and timing of new legislation affecting Social Security and to identify opportunities to raise the special concerns of women and other vulnerable populations in future legislative debates, so that their needs can be addressed.

 

Occupational Segregation and the Gender Wage Gap: A Job Half Done
by Ariane Hegewisch and Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D. (June 2014)

This report was prepared by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) as a part of a series of Scholars’ Papers sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor Women's Bureau in commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of American Women: Report of the President’s Commission on the Status of Women, 1963.

 

Paid Parental Leave in the United States: What the Data Tell Us about Access, Usage, and Economic and Health Benefits
by Barbara Gault, Ph.D., Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., Ariane Hegewisch, Jessica Milli, Ph.D., Lindsey Reichlin (June 2014)

This paper was prepared by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) as a part of a series of Scholars’ Papers sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor Women's Bureau in commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of American Women: Report of the President’s Commission on the Status of Women, 1963.

 

The Gender Wage Gap: 2013; Differences by Race and Ethnicity, No Growth in Real Wages for Women
by Ariane Hegewisch, Claudia Williams, Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., and Stephanie Keller Hudiburg (March 2014)

The gender wage gap in the United States has not seen significant improvement in recent years, and remains a reality for women across racial and ethnic groups. In 2013, the ratio of women’s to men’s median weekly full-time earnings was 82.1 percent, an increase of more than one percentage point since 2012,when the ratio was 80.9 percent (but still slightly lower than the 2011 ratio of 82.2 percent). This corresponds to a weekly gender wage gap of 17.9 percent. Real earnings have remained largely unchanged since 2012; women’s median weekly earnings increased by $5 to $706 in 2013; men’s median weekly earnings increased to $860, a marginal increase of $7 compared with 2012.

 

Testimony of Heidi Hartmann before House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee
by Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D. (January 2014)

IWPR President Heidi Hartmann's testimony on equal pay and the minimum wage before the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee for the hearing, "When Women Succeed, America Succeeds: Moving Forward on the Five-Year Anniversary of Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act," held on January 29, 2014.

 

How Equal Pay for Working Women would Reduce Poverty and Grow the American Economy
by Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., Jeffrey Hayes, Ph.D., and Jennifer Clark (January 2014)

Persistent earnings inequality for working women translates into lower pay, less family income, and more poverty in families with a working woman, which is of no small consequence to working families. About 71 percent of all mothers in the United States work for pay. Of these, about two-thirds (68 percent) are married and typically have access to men’s incomes, but married women’s earnings are nevertheless crucial to family support. One-third (32 percent) are single mothers and often the sole support of their families. And many without children, both single and married, work to support themselves and other family members. This briefing paper summarizes analyses of the 2010-2012 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic supplement and uses statistical controls for labor supply, human capital, and labor market characteristics to estimate: 1) how much women’s earnings and family incomes would rise with equal pay; 2) how much women and their families lose because women earn less than similarly qualified men; and 3) how much the economy as a whole suffers from inequality in pay between women and men.

 

How Education Pays Off for Older Americans
by Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D. and Jeff Hayes (December 2013)

This report presents findings from an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the 2005-2009 American Community Survey data regarding the earnings of older men and women with different levels of education. The analysis was funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and is part of IWPR’s on-going research concerning the economic status and security of older women and men.

 
Document Actions
Go to Home Page