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Elyse Shaw, Research Associate

Latest Reports from IWPR

Status of Women in the South
by Julie Anderson, M.A, Elyse Shaw, M.A., Chandra Childers, Ph.D., Jessica Milli, Ph.D., and Asha DuMonthier (February 2016)

The Status of Women in the South builds on IWPR’s long-standing analyses and reports, The Status of Women in the States, that have provided data on the status of women nationally and for all 50 states plus the District of Columbia since 1996. The Status of Women in the South uses data from U.S. government and other sources to analyze women’s status in the southern United States, including Alabama, Arkansas, the District of Columbia, Florida Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia. States are ranked and graded on a set of indicators for six topical areas and, whenever possible, data is disaggregated by race and ethnicity to allow closer examination of the status of women of color in the South. Like all Status of Women in the States reports, The Status of Women in the South can be used to highlight women’s progress and the obstacles they continue to face and to encourage policy and programmatic changes that can improve women’s opportunities. This report is funded by the Ford Foundation, the American Federation of Teachers, and the Women’s Funding Network. Additional funding was provided by a variety of state and national partners. With advice and guidance from the Status of Women in the South Advisory Committee, this report has been informed by The Status of Women in the States: 2015, which also benefited from the expertise of its National Advisory Committee.

 

Get to the Bricks: The Experiences of Black Women from New Orleans Public Housing After Hurricane Katrina
by Jane Henrici, Ph.D., with Chandra Childers, Ph.D., and Elyse Shaw, M.A. (August 2015)

Get to the Bricks: The Experiences of Black Women from New Orleans Public Housing After Hurricane Katrina presents the results of qualitative research conducted with 184 low-income black women who lived in public housing prior to Hurricane Katrina and the flooding of New Orleans, and who were displaced by the hurricane and the closure and demolition of their housing. This report attempts to answer a series of interconnected questions regarding the challenges that women in public housing faced when trying to evacuate, while displaced, and when trying to return or settle in new communities. The study explores the reasoning behind their choices to either return to New Orleans or remain displaced and the resources that were or were not avilable to these women as they attempted to make the best decisions for themselves and their families after such an enormous disaster. This report recommends a more holistic approach to disaster relief efforts in the United States, including coordinated services and policies that consider the needs of the most vulnerable portions of the population. The report is part of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research’s work, begun in 2005, focusing on women from different communities, backgrounds, and experiences along the U.S. Gulf Coast following the Katrina-related disasters. The research is also one of a set of investigations conducted as a part of the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) Katrina Task Force.

 

Women and Men in the Recovery: Where the Jobs Are; Women Recover Jobs Lost in Recession in Year Five
by Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., Elyse Shaw, and Rachel O'Connor (November 2014)

While the number of jobs dropped steeply, particularly for men, in the Great Recession, slow job growth has characterized the recovery. In the first two years of the recovery, men saw faster job growth than women. By the third year of recovery, in terms of share of jobs lost that were regained, women’s job growth saw pronounced gains and largely caught up to men’s. Within the recovery’s fourth year, the percentage of lost jobs regained by women overall exceeded that of lost jobs regained by men. The fifth year of recovery saw women surpass their pre-recession levels of employment, while men have not yet made up their recession job losses. As of June 2014, men had regained 90.1 percent of the jobs they lost in the recession and women had regained 136.3 percent of theirs.

 

Women and Men in the Recovery: Where the Jobs Are; Women’s Recovery Strengthens in Year Four
by Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., Elyse Shaw, and Elizabeth Pandya (November 2013)

While the number of jobs dropped steeply, particularly for men, in the Great Recession, slow job growth has characterized much of the recovery. In the first two years of the recovery men saw faster job growth than women. In the third year of recovery, women's job growth saw pronounced gains and had largely caught up to men's. Strong gains continued for women into the fourth year of recovery where, overall, the percentage of job’s recovered for women surpassed that of men’s. As of June 2013, men had regained 68 percent of the jobs they lost in the recession and women had regained 91 percent of the jobs they lost.

 

Enhancing the Status of Women: How Engaging Women in Leadership Creates a More Inclusive Democracy and Improves Women’s Lives
by Elyse Shaw, Drew McCormick, Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., and Barbara Gault, Ph.D. (May 2013)

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research has been at the forefront of research on issues and policies that affect women’s continued participation and leadership in society and politics. Through its analysis of the issues of greatest importance to women in society, IWPR has greatly contributed to social and policy changes. The research done by IWPR in the area of democracy and society across the years has shown the ways in which American society benefits from the advancement of women in leadership positions and women’s increased civic and political engagement. IWPR’s research also highlights policy changes that would help women achieve greater equity. IWPR continues to work both internationally and domestically to provide relevant data on issues of importance to women’s lives and has disseminated its research through various conferences to ensure that advocates and policymakers alike have the tools to enable them to participate in making policy changes that benefit women and their families.

 
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