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Ariane Hegewisch, Study Director

Ariane Hegewisch has been a Study Director at IWPR since the summer of 2008; prior to that she spent two years at IWPR as a scholar-in-residence. She came to IWPR from the Center for WorkLife Law at UC Hastings. She is responsible for IWPR’s research on workplace discrimination and is a specialist in comparative human resource management, with a focus on policies and legislative approaches to facilitate greater work life reconciliation and gender equality, in the US and internationally. Prior to coming to the USA she taught comparative European human resource management at Cranfield School of Management in the UK where she was a founding researcher of the Cranet Survey of International HRM, the largest independent survey of human resource management policies and practices, covering 25 countries worldwide. She started her career  in local economic development, developing strategies for greater gender equality in employment and training in  local government in the UK. She has published many papers and articles and co-edited several books, including ‘Women, work and inequality: The challenge of equal pay in a deregulated labour market”. She is German and has a BSc in Economics from the London School of Economics and an MPhil in Development Studies from the IDS, Sussex.

Latest Reports from IWPR

The Gender Wage Gap: 2013
by Ariane Hegewisch and Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D. (September 2014)

The ratio of women’s and men’s median annual earnings was 78.3 percent for full-time/year-round workers in 2013. This means the gender wage gap for full-time/year-round workers is 21.7 percent. Women’s median annual earnings in 2013 were $39,157 compared with $50,033 for men. Neither women’s nor men’s earnings significantly improved compared with 2012. If the pace of change in the annual earnings ratio continues at the same rate as it has since 1960, it will take another 45 years, until 2058, for men and women to reach parity.

 

Occupational Segregation and the Gender Wage Gap: A Job Half Done
by Ariane Hegewisch and Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D. (June 2014)

This report was prepared by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) as a part of a series of Scholars’ Papers sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor Women's Bureau in commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of American Women: Report of the President’s Commission on the Status of Women, 1963.

 

Paid Parental Leave in the United States: What the Data Tell Us about Access, Usage, and Economic and Health Benefits
by Barbara Gault, Ph.D., Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., Ariane Hegewisch, Jessica Milli, Ph.D., Lindsey Reichlin (June 2014)

This paper was prepared by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) as a part of a series of Scholars’ Papers sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor Women's Bureau in commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of American Women: Report of the President’s Commission on the Status of Women, 1963.

 

The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation and by Race and Ethnicity, 2013
by Ariane Hegewisch and Stephanie Keller Hudiburg (April 2014)

Women’s median earnings are lower than men’s in nearly all occupations, whether they work in occupations predominantly done by women, occupations predominantly done by men, or occupations with a more even mix of men and women. Data for both women’s and men’s median weekly earnings for full-time work are available for 112 occupations ; there are only three occupations in which women have higher median weekly earnings than men. In 101 of the 112 occupations, the gender earnings ratio of women’s median weekly earnings to men’s is 0.95 or lower (that is, a wage gap of at least 5 cents per dollar earned by men); in 17 of these occupations the gender earnings ratio is lower than 0.75 (that is, a wage gap of more than 25 cents per dollar earned by men).

 

The Gender Wage Gap: 2013; Differences by Race and Ethnicity, No Growth in Real Wages for Women
by Ariane Hegewisch, Claudia Williams, Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., and Stephanie Keller Hudiburg (March 2014)

The gender wage gap in the United States has not seen significant improvement in recent years, and remains a reality for women across racial and ethnic groups. In 2013, the ratio of women’s to men’s median weekly full-time earnings was 82.1 percent, an increase of more than one percentage point since 2012,when the ratio was 80.9 percent (but still slightly lower than the 2011 ratio of 82.2 percent). This corresponds to a weekly gender wage gap of 17.9 percent. Real earnings have remained largely unchanged since 2012; women’s median weekly earnings increased by $5 to $706 in 2013; men’s median weekly earnings increased to $860, a marginal increase of $7 compared with 2012.

 

The Gender Wage Gap: 2012
by Ariane Hegewisch, Claudia Williams (September 2013)

The ratio of women’s and men’s median annual earnings was 76.5 percent for full-time/year-round workers in 2012. This means the gender wage gap for full-time/year-round workers is 23.5 percent. Women’s median annual earnings in 2012 were $37,791 compared with $49,398 for men. The gender wage gap has stayed essentially unchanged since 2001. In the previous decade, between 1991 and 2000, it closed by almost four percentage points, and in the decade prior to that, 1981 and 1990, by over ten percentage points (Table 2). If the pace of change in the annual earnings ratio continues at the same rate as it has since 1960, it will take another 45 years, until 2058, for men and women to reach parity.

 

Balancing Work and Family: How Analyzing the Costs and Benefits of Work-Family Legislation Supports Policy Change
by Maureen Sarna, Ariane Hegewisch, and Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D. (June 2013)

important policies in allowing workers, particularly women who do the majority of family care, to balance employment with care giving responsibilities, including: family and medical leave and paid sick days, child care, and workplace flexibility. By identifying and estimating the costs and benefits of a wide range of workplace policies to both workers and their families, as well as to employers and society as a whole, IWPR has provided strong evidence against claims that these policies harm businesses and the economy. IWPR research has informed legislation at the local, state, and national levels. IWPR’s work has been highly influential in the passage of most of the nation’s leave policies, including the federal Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993, New Jersey’s Family Leave Insurance Program, California’s Paid Family Leave (PFL), and paid sick days legislation in San Francisco, the District of Columbia, Milwaukee (subsequently overturned by the state government), Connecticut, Seattle, and New York City.

 
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